A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


writing

Chagrin Falls, Ohio

IN THE June 3 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Abby L. Vandiver
also writing as Abby Collette


The setting of a book can make you snuggle in or can whisk you away. It is the backdrop of a good story and helps to create the mood. So when I decided to write an ice cream cozy mystery, I knew my setting had to be fun.

{ 0 comments }

Fast Horses and Foul Play

IN THE June 3 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Carmen Radtke


Writers are world-builders, no matter if it’s a small, intimate portrait of a well-known place or a sprawling epic set in a parallel universe with its own rules and laws of physic.

{ 0 comments }

by Cynthia Chow
& Ellery Adams


Readers will be delighted to return for the sixth time to Storyton Hall, a five-star resort in West Virginia catering to bibliophiles from around the world. Book-themed rooms, enormous libraries, book clubs, and now a Family Valentine’s Celebration event specifically for young readers and children’s book authors are all featured at this unique destination. A lucky family has been awarded a free vacation stay at the resort during the special weekend as well, and Storyton manager Jane Steward is looking forward to welcoming the deserving Gilbert family.

{ 36 comments }

by Kathleen Costa


The Treasure King, a boat twice the size of anything at the marina and with a captain whose last visit to Seaside Cove was trouble, has once again docked. The trouble starts immediately when Captain Carroll is asked, more like demanded, to move his boat, which also included a follow-up visit from the law to punctuate the idea of following the rules. The captain is also publicizing he has evidence that shows the location of the San Manuel, a ship that in 1568 sunk with treasure worth millions, if not billions, in today’s market. So is it any surprise that the captain is found dead? Arguments. Threats. Competition. Greed. Murder.

{ 12 comments }

by Lorie Lewis Ham


This is the third in our series featuring mystery podcasts! This week we are interviewing host and mystery author Eric Beetner about his podcast Writer Types.

{ 0 comments }

Lily Takes the Lead

IN THE May 27 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by C.L. Bauer


While most writers produce work based on what they know, I find I begin there, and I grow with my characters. I’ve just published my fourth novel, The Sweet Pea Secret, and I’m just as excited as when I saw my first one in print. This novel is no different.

{ 1 comment }

The Inspiration For Dickens the Dog

IN THE May 27 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andPets
SECTIONS

by Kathy Manos Penn


In my Dickens & Christie cozy mystery series, Leta Parker owns a Great Pyrenees named Dickens, but not just any Pyr. Hers is a dwarf; they do exist, just not in great numbers. You can’t go out and find one at a pet store or get one from a breeder. They’re anomalies.

{ 3 comments }

by Sandra Murphy &
Jacqueline Seewald


Kim Reynolds searched for her biological father and finally found him. While some men would balk at the notion a stranger announcing she is his child, James Shaw not only listens to her but asks for a DNA test to prove his paternity and shares the background of his relationship with her mother. His wife has since passed away and his son, Dylan, has disappeared without a trace.

{ 13 comments }

by Sandra Murphy


Granny Smythe’s orchard was in the red when Winnie came home to help out. Thanks to Winnie’s creativity and great tasting cider, the orchard is now in the black. One of the ways they improved the bottom line was to rent out the property. This time it’s for an outdoor wedding in the orchard, the reception in the barn, with an old farm truck as the bride and groom’s getaway vehicle.

{ 17 comments }

by Ang Pompano


Writing Murder on Pleasant Avenue was a joy on several levels. First, it is the twenty-third book in the Gaslight Mystery Series, so every book in that series is kind of a miracle because I never expected the series to last beyond six books! So that’s exciting.

{ 14 comments }

Why P.I.s Are Cool

IN THE May 20 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by DP Lyle


Cops are cool, and memorable fictional characters, but P.I.s seem to come in more variable and quirkier flavors. From ex-military types to everyday folks with a knack for sniffing out wrongdoing to little old ladies with cats. The latter tend to be the smartest and toughest. This wide variety is what makes reading P.I. stories fun. Private investigators, both licensed and amateur, tend to be more eccentric, possess different skills (some useful, others less so), and seem to break the rules with impunity. How much fun is that?

{ 5 comments }

by Sandra Murphy & Elizabeth Logan


In Elkview, Alaska, Charlotte “Charlie” Cooke has taken over the Bear Claw Diner, formerly run by her mom. Mom and Dad are on a European cruise while Charlie keeps the 24-hour diner going, serving delicious food. She hasn’t made many suggestions, especially to the food. Chef Oliver is opposed to the smallest change, unless it’s his idea. Adding chocolate to bear claws? A travesty!

{ 13 comments }

by Kathleen Costa


Mabel Skinner has inherited her Aunt Peggy’s garlic farm appropriately, but oddly, christened “Stinkin’ Stuff Farm.” She knows how to code and create apps, a solitary career that fits her personality, however, it is in stark contrast to her Aunt Peggy’s community involvement and plethora of friends in the small Massachusetts town of West Slocum.

{ 10 comments }

In Praise of the Backyard Garden

IN THE May 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Eve Calder


Lately I’ve been craving a little time in the backyard garden. The only problem: I have neither. Not a backyard. And definitely nothing that qualifies as a “garden.” Unless you count the cluster of bamboo plants in my sunny living room. And, between you and me, they looked a lot healthier before I brought them home from the store.

{ 0 comments }

  • Arts & Entertainment

  • Books & Tales

  • Community

  • Education

  • Food Fun

  • Helping Hands

  • Hometown History

  • Pets

  • Teens

  • Terrific Tales