A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Books & Tales

by Kathleen Costa


Thirty-one-year-old Yaley Woodard, a local tour guide for the Sierra Club, has been missing for a couple of days, and Violet Rhinehammer is right there with the “Breaking News,” sticking her microphone into Mae’s face for insights. Mae hadn’t even heard that anyone had been “snatched” in broad daylight, but she did personally understand that one might just up and leave without notice. Disillusioned by her own small town life and childhood tragedies, Mae left Perrysburg, Kentucky, the second she turned eighteen, never really intending to return.

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by Kathleen Costa


Finding entertainment during this “stay at home” season may be challenging, however, for me, it is as close as my iPad and the BritBox app. I am a happy Anglophile with a huge library of movies, mini series, and television shows included in my very reasonable membership (monthly or annual fee options). I can start with a couple comedy shows like Waiting for God and Scarborough or dramas like DSI Bancroft and Casualty 1900s: London Hospital, or get comfy for a long weekend of binging all of thriller MI-5 and police procedural Prime Suspect. I have also found new-to-me shows like Taggart, Blandings, and The Mallorca Files offering lots of entertainment.

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by Sandra Murphy &
Jacqueline Seewald


Kim Reynolds searched for her biological father and finally found him. While some men would balk at the notion a stranger announcing she is his child, James Shaw not only listens to her but asks for a DNA test to prove his paternity and shares the background of his relationship with her mother. His wife has since passed away and his son, Dylan, has disappeared without a trace.

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by Sandra Murphy


Granny Smythe’s orchard was in the red when Winnie came home to help out. Thanks to Winnie’s creativity and great tasting cider, the orchard is now in the black. One of the ways they improved the bottom line was to rent out the property. This time it’s for an outdoor wedding in the orchard, the reception in the barn, with an old farm truck as the bride and groom’s getaway vehicle.

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by Kathleen Costa


Poppy’s “slimy” cousin Hubert Leach, a property agent, has been a bittersweet part in her life, but she thought the “quid pro quo” agreement she’d made would turn out to be simple and easy to fulfill. He had given Nell a lucrative cleaning contract, and Poppy promised a return “favor,” and being his date at an invitation-only cocktail party seemed a small price to pay. Until the “quo” was more than her “quid” could handle.

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by John M. Floyd


“What I can’t figure out,” Nate said, as he lay in the dirt behind a clump of cactus near Rosie Hapwell’s house, “is why you married that idiot in the first place.”
Before Rosie could reply, another bullet whined off a rock three feet away. Both of them ducked their heads and crawled to the dry wash where Nate had left his horse.

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by Ang Pompano


Writing Murder on Pleasant Avenue was a joy on several levels. First, it is the twenty-third book in the Gaslight Mystery Series, so every book in that series is kind of a miracle because I never expected the series to last beyond six books! So that’s exciting.

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Why P.I.s Are Cool

IN THE May 20 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by DP Lyle


Cops are cool, and memorable fictional characters, but P.I.s seem to come in more variable and quirkier flavors. From ex-military types to everyday folks with a knack for sniffing out wrongdoing to little old ladies with cats. The latter tend to be the smartest and toughest. This wide variety is what makes reading P.I. stories fun. Private investigators, both licensed and amateur, tend to be more eccentric, possess different skills (some useful, others less so), and seem to break the rules with impunity. How much fun is that?

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by Cynthia Chow


Anyone who hates a puppy is just setting herself up for murder. Not that Beverly Ruchart deserves to die for accusing the adorable rescue dog Tucker for digging up her garden, but MacKenzie “Mac” Almeida has proof that her niece’s puppy is innocent. Using her minister father and astrologist mother as role models, Mac attempts to be amenable, but Mrs. Ruchart is just as rude and demanding as a customer at Mac’s Bikes rental and repair shop in their town of Westham, Cape Cod. So when Mac’s friend Gin Malloy finds Mrs. Ruchart dead at Gin’s Salty Taffy shop, Mac knows that there will be a bounty of suspects to investigate in order to help prove her friend’s innocence.

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by Sandra Murphy & Elizabeth Logan


In Elkview, Alaska, Charlotte “Charlie” Cooke has taken over the Bear Claw Diner, formerly run by her mom. Mom and Dad are on a European cruise while Charlie keeps the 24-hour diner going, serving delicious food. She hasn’t made many suggestions, especially to the food. Chef Oliver is opposed to the smallest change, unless it’s his idea. Adding chocolate to bear claws? A travesty!

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by Gary Hoffman


“I’m very sorry Judge Blankenship, but there is a young woman in the waiting area who insists on seeing you now,” the maître d’ said as he handed the judge a business card.

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by Kathleen Costa


Mabel Skinner has inherited her Aunt Peggy’s garlic farm appropriately, but oddly, christened “Stinkin’ Stuff Farm.” She knows how to code and create apps, a solitary career that fits her personality, however, it is in stark contrast to her Aunt Peggy’s community involvement and plethora of friends in the small Massachusetts town of West Slocum.

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by Sharon Tucker


Comfort reads are always a necessity, and mine currently are romantic thrillers I read or meant to read some time ago (with the occasional sci-fi or fantasy novel thrown in for variety) and I do find them all most comforting. The world of the thrillers is something I recognize from my early years of getting lost in fiction and, as ever, with genre reading we recognize where we are and we like it or go home. Mary Stewart’s novels were my favorites, and I’ve read them all so I decided to explore others in the same vein.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


Here is your weekly reminder that there are also new articles up on our other website KRL News & Reviews! Every week there will be book reviews and giveaways, plus sometimes pet articles, theatre articles, and more! And listen to our new podcast!

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