A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Tales of Diversity

by Mark Redwine


In the context of immigration at the southern border, the elephants are the powers and principalities that control immigration policies. The grass represents the immigrants and the people who provide assistance.
The most obvious problem we face with solving the immigration crisis at the border is the politically venomous rhetoric spewing from Republicans and Democrats.

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by Steven Sanchez




The Academy Award-nominated film Minari (2020) tells the story of a family of South Korean immigrants who try to make it in the rural United States during the 1980s. There have been very few stories like that told on the big screen, but the truth of the matter is that there are so many accounts of immigrants coming to this country for a better life and to live the “American Dream.” They come from all walks of life and represent different cultures. That is one of the things that makes this country amazing.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


June is Pride month, but sadly, there are many places that still don’t acknowledge and recognize that fact. Former Selma, CA resident Lance Nelson decided that he wanted to make an effort to change that, starting with the area where he grew up. Lance was born and raised in Selma and attended Wilson Elementary School, Lincoln Middle School, and Selma High School. He graduated from Selma High School in 2006. Lance is currently attending Columbia University, majoring in human rights with an interest in equal access to education. His future goal is to work for a nonprofit, and perhaps one day, even the United Nations.

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by Mark Redwine


Back in March, when I wrote my last article, I was much younger and excitedly expecting our new administration to snap its fingers or wave a magic wand, and instantly materialize a new immigration system that would be fair and compassionate for all. At first, the immigration changes (especially those concerning asylum seekers) appeared to be all unicorns and rainbows. But reality raised its ugly head, and my illusions and hopes were flung to the ground. It is funny how disappointment can age you.

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by Mark Redwine


The refugee camp for asylum-seekers is no more. Two weeks ago, the first busload of refugees legally crossed the bridge that spans the Rio Grande River between Matamoros, Mexico and Brownsville, Texas. When they arrived at the Brownsville bus station, a crowd greeted them with applause, cheers, tears, hugs, handshakes, and exuberant joy expressing the start of the end of two long years of suffering in the camp. I was not able to greet that bus, but have been able to greet several since then. Yesterday, the last bus from the camp crossed into Brownsville. Today, the few people left in the camp were taken to a shelter in Mexico and the camp is now empty.

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by Mark Redwine


The Space-X spaceport is about twenty minutes from our home. We drove out there today to see the latest prototype of the starship that will take humans to Mars. Her name is SN-9. She could fly next week. They have been test firing her engines and doing pressure tests on her for several days. Many of her predecessors did not survive the tests leading up to a launch. One reason is that some of the tests were designed to find out how much pressure the ship could handle.

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by Mark Redwine


Thanksgiving Thursday, eating turkey, watching football, thankful for all of my blessings, many of which I take for granted. Among my greatest blessings, and greatest heartaches, are the immigrants in the refugee camp on the Mexican side of the border at Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


As theatre continues to be presented online, University Theatre at Fresno State will be presenting its latest show, Detroit ’67, streaming December 4-12. The cast includes Trey Jones, Alexis Myles, Madeline Nelson, Nwachukwu Oputa, and TJ Taylor. We chatted with the director of the show, Thomas-Whit Ellis, Professor of Theatre Arts, Department Chair, Africana Studies, to learn more.

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by Joe Cosentino


In Drama Christmas, hunky and hilarious armchair sleuth Professor of Play Directing Nicky Abbondanza (Bob Cratchit), his handsome husband Associate Professor of Acting Noah Oliver (Nephew Freddy), their son Taavi (Tiny Tim), best friends Department Chair Martin Anderson (Scrooge/Carol), Ruben Markinson (Marley/Ghost of the Lover of the Past), and Martin’s sassy office assistant Shayla Johnson (Housekeeper) star in a musical version of Scrooge’s A Christmas Carol at Treemeadow College, entitled Call Me Carol! The show proves that every Christmas needs a good Carol. Nicky’s favorite target, Detective Manuello (Ghost of the Lover of the Present) and Nicky and Noah’s both sets of wacky parents, are along for the bumpy ride.

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by Steven Sanchez



We’re in the 21st century and still we hear about hate crimes taking place. After all this time, there are even now people out in the world committing acts of racism, discrimination, Islamophobia, homophobia, xenophobia, etc., and it seems like we never progress. It’s like the 50s and the 60s all over again.

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by Sharon Tucker


What I love about each holiday season is that each is unlike any other before. The celebrations themselves usually stay within certain parameters but including different people in the mix or going to a new place during the season adds verve and just might open our perceptions. This is true of reading holiday stories from a variety of authors’ points of view, and in Festive Mayhem: Ten Stories of Holiday Mystery, Crime and Suspense (2020), Carolyn Marie Wilkins has collected works that celebrate diversity.

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by Steven Sanchez



The year 2020 has undoubtedly been a rough one for everybody. I don’t need to make a list of what has transpired during the last few months that hasn’t already been talked about, and thrown in our faces every day. It’s been quite an adjustment for all the people who have had to cope with just existing in this first year of the new decade. Some have found a way to thrive; some, unfortunately, have had a tough time. There are those who are just taking it day by day, and taking the good with the bad. For Valley resident and Olympic BMX rider, Brooke Crain, this year has been one heck of a ride.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham
& Joe Cosentino


When asked to review The Player I was immediately intrigued by the premise and said yes, and boy am I glad that I did. The Player is actually two separate cozy mysteries together, The City House and The Country House. They feature music teacher Andre Beaufort and playboy ghost Freddy Birtswistle.

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by Martha Reed



One of the great joys of writing a new mystery series is meeting the unknown cast of characters being introduced into this freshly imagined world. A reader can rely on a certain amount of trust that the author will offer insights into the human condition in addition to creating characters that are interesting enough to follow for 300 pages. An author doesn’t have that initial luxury; we operate on blind faith knowing we can put a final polish on a character through editing.

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