Hometown History

Black Pearl, Red Light: A Bordello Bloodbath, Its Coverup, and a Young Woman Lost to Time

by Sarah Peterson-Camacho


Blood saturated every surface: splattered across the walls, soaking through the bedsheets. Arterial spray darkening from ruby to rust, placing the precise time of the murder-suicide some twelve hours prior. The nude forms of a young man and woman faced one another on the bed, their expressions serene despite the gaping mess of their flayed throats. Hers had been cut just above the clavicle, his severed at the Adam’s apple. A bone-handled razor lay at his side, slick with clotted crimson.

Reedley’s Native People Being Recognized

by Jim Mulligan


The simultaneous, yet conflicting, demoralization and romanticism of the Native Peoples of the Americas throughout modern American history is a fascinating and sad phenomenon. They were often portrayed as savages, attacking the pioneers heading west to claim their virgin land under Manifest Destiny. Yet, many amateur genealogists lay claim to Native American inheritance.

She Walks Two Rivers: La Llorona of the Kings & the San Joaquin

by Sarah Peterson-Camacho


Threading the digital byways of paranormal blogs and websites, ghostly urban legends spring up with surprising regularity. And for every alleged supernatural encounter, there is a Woman in White—or a Vanishing Hitchhiker. These legends linger and mingle in the comments of anonymous storytellers around a virtual campfire, blurring the boundaries of fact and fiction, life and death.

The Reedley Grammar School Bell

by Jim Mulligan


school district existed, and even before the town had a name, a schoolhouse was erected on the Thomas Law Reed ranch; it was known as the Smith Ferry School. In what some called a twist of bad luck (which others may have deemed arson), an attempt to move that schoolhouse into the burgeoning city of Reedley came to an abrupt halt when the school burned to the ground in February of 1890.

Landscapes and Landmarks of the Great Central Valley

by Terrance Mc Arthur
& Janice Stevens


The Great Central Valley. The San Joaquin Valley. The Heart of California. The Big Valley.
It’s an amazing place to explore, and it’s even better to explore it with people you like. Two of my favorite traveling companions are Pat Hunter and Janice Stevens, although I’ve never shared a car with them. I travel in their books. With Hunter’s delicate watercolors and Stevens’ concise prose, they’ve helped me explore Fresno’s architectural gems, the twenty-one missions of California’s El Camino Real, the stomping grounds of William Saroyan’s past, and Highway 1’s stretch up the California coastline from Mexico to Oakland.

Reedley Lumber Co.

by Jim Mulligan


At 7:20 on a crisp, clear Saturday morning in January, just as the sun began to makes its presence known east of the Sierras, three pick-up trucks sat idling, keeping the occupants toasty warm in the parking lot of one of the oldest businesses in Reedley. At 7:23 the lights inside Reedley Lumber Co. popped on in sections, indicating to the outside world, namely the aforementioned men huddling in the warmth of their vehicles, that the day was officially beginning. At 7:26 the doors were unlocked, and like moths to a flame, the gentlemen who had been so patiently waiting, exited the comfort of their trucks and made a beeline for the entrance.

Reedley Museum Will Be Celebrating 40th Anniversary in 2019

by Lorie Lewis Ham


The first time I went inside the Reedley Museum was with my daughter's class in elementary school many years ago. When I worked for the Reedley Exponent I was there often as they are a fountain of information about Reedley's interesting past. Recently I sat down for a chat with their current Curator, Karey Olson, to touch base with all they have to offer. Karey has been a volunteer with the museum for six year.

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The gold medal for all-around wonderful kitty could easily go to darling Chicken Little! This cutiepie never misses an opportunity to hoot it up with her friends, explore any nook or cranny, and make it her mission to check out whatever happens to be going on. Chicken Little came along way after suffering a toe injury calling for immediate amputation. She's all better now and you can't even notice she's missing a rear toe. What an adorable combination she is of fun-loving spirit and sweet, deep affection, a girl who will easily capture hearts in a forever family that cherishes her. Precious Chicken Little would love to be your most darling doll! Check her out on the Cat House website to learn more.