A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


BBC

by Kathleen Costa


Anglophiles in the United States have always been at a disadvantage when trying to access U.K. television programs and movies. Some are picked up and presented on local public television stations, but consistency and variety are problematic.

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by Kathleen Costa


BritBox and Acorn-TV are the best to whet any Anglophile’s appetite, and with very few, if any, overlaps in programming, I can justify having both services.

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by Sharon Tucker


As we know, translation from the page to the stage is problematic. We readers are notorious for our loyalty to the ‘mise en scene’ in our heads, not to mention ideas about everything else from the characters’ appearances to following the books’ plots to the letter. Some novels are an easier go-to script because they are written with the object of production in mind and read almost like a screenplay already. However, this was not the case with the Shetland novels of Ann Cleeves.

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Acorn-TV Rocks!

IN THE August 12 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andKathleen Costa,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Kathleen Costa


ACORN-TV continues to provide hundreds of the best programming options including news & reviews, mysteries, dramas, comedies, documentaries, foreign language, feature films and some programs only available on or original to Acorn-TV. The regular monthly or annual subscription fees are very reasonable and with hours of commercial-free streaming enjoyment for the true anglophiles, you won’t be wondering, “What’s on the telly tonight?”

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by Kathleen Costa


Acorn-TV provides hundreds of the best programming options including news & reviews, mysteries, dramas, comedies, documentaries, foreign language, feature films, and some programs only available on ACORN-TV. Currently there is a free trial, but the regular monthly or annual subscription fees seem reasonable. With hours of commercial-free streaming enjoyment for the true fan of UK productions, you won’t be wondering, “What’s on tonight?”

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Mr. Lovejoy? …No, Just Lovejoy

IN THE August 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2016 Articles,
andKathleen Costa,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Kathleen Costa


As many will attest, British crime shows peek my interest every time. From dark suspense to quirky ‘dramedies,’ I revel in the varied accents, quaint village settings and it’s just far enough removed from American culture to be fascinating. So sitting enjoying a ‘cuppa,’ exploring YouTube to see if some of my favorites, long gone from even the most independent station, were available. What a delightful surprise to find a show with a wonderful twist on the crime-drama formula was accessible…Lovejoy!

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by Kathleen Costa


Inspector Morse concluded its run in 2000, but not its popularity. “What will the next invasion bring?” Two spin-off dramas crossed to our shores providing a positive nod to the original, yet unique enough to become favorites among the “Morse” fans.

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by Kathleen Costa


Paul Revere wouldn’t have been so worried had the British crossing to our shores been an army of detective dramas. He would have foregone his ride through the countryside, put on a pot of black-market tea and sat and enjoyed the invasion. He would have noticed a diversity in the era, setting and style of the lead detective and supporting team, but would have recognized that the programs shared the English twang, unique locations and intriguing characters. Paul would have become a convert!

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by Sharon Tucker


CAUTION: Spoilers abound.
Having had a bit of time to think about and see the latest Moffat and Gatiss Sherlock a time or two, I have to admit I like it now much better than I did initially. Somehow I had developed an unrealistic yearning to spend the whole action of the story in Conan Doyle’s era, enjoying Holmes and Watson exclusively in their original setting, but I was ignoring the essence of what Moffat and Gatiss always do with Conan Doyle’s characters and plots.
They turn the stories around.

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Doctor Who: TV Review

IN THE August 16 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andChris Lovato,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Chris Lovato



We can start in 1963, when Doctor Who first graced British televisions until 1983, when it was cancelled. Resurrected by Russell T. Davies in 2005, it’s captured the hearts of American audiences quite recently, and it has only grown in popularity since then.

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A Tale of Two Sherlocks

IN THE February 15 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andDeborah Harter Williams,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Deborah Harter Williams


The BBC’s Sherlock and CBS’s Elementary provide two wonderfully divergent flavors of Sherlock Holmes, Watson, Moriarty et al. You might call them light and dark.

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Being Human, US & UK Versions: TV Review

IN THE January 5 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Lauryn Crum



To be human: breathing, eating, sleeping, running, laughing, crying, wanting, missing, loving, losing, talking, yelling, whispering, staying up late, long car rides, adventures, funny faces, music, movies, comfort, and life. All these things we associate with being alive and being ourselves. What if all this was taken away from you by dying and turning into a ghost, being bitten by a vampire or by a werewolf?

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by Deborah Harter Williams



Starting its second season May 6 (PBS) is the BBC’s Sherlock. The three new episodes will be reworks of the classics: “A Scandal in Bohemia” (Irene Adler with nudity and laptops), “The Hound of the Baskervilles” (a 20 year disappearance…a monstrous hound…I wouldn’t have missed this for the world) and “The Final Problem.”

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Sherlock in the 21st Century

IN THE November 6 ISSUE

FROM THE Books & Tales,
andContributors,
andLorie Lewis Ham,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Lorie Lewis Ham



“I am not a psychopath, Anderson, I’m a high functioning sociopath. Do your research.” That is a quote from Sherlock Holmes in the new Sherlock series from the BBC currently playing on PBS on Masterpiece mystery.

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