A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Sharon Tucker

by Sharon Tucker


In 1990, I remember sitting in a theater, stunned by the turn of events at the end of Presumed Innocent. Now that I have read three of Scott Turow’s Kindle County novels with the same characters, I see that his characters and plots are even better on the page. The internal monologues detail so much more than actors can ever vocalize. It is really a pleasure to go back and read what made the books best sellers and to discover more about these rich characters.

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by Sharon Tucker


Comfort reads are always a necessity, and mine currently are romantic thrillers I read or meant to read some time ago (with the occasional sci-fi or fantasy novel thrown in for variety) and I do find them all most comforting. The world of the thrillers is something I recognize from my early years of getting lost in fiction and, as ever, with genre reading we recognize where we are and we like it or go home. Mary Stewart’s novels were my favorites, and I’ve read them all so I decided to explore others in the same vein.

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by Sharon Tucker


I have only recently begun to read Mary Higgins Clark. Her style is rather more journalistic than I usually like, but I must say she tells a good, textured story. Having authored over fifty books, won numerous awards, and sold millions of titles, she passed away January 31, 2020, at the age of ninety-two. She was associated with Simon and Schuster publishing house, and the same editor for over forty-four years, a remarkable record in itself.

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by Sharon Tucker


I have been saddened at the passing of Marion Chesney Gibbon. I have only begun to process these feelings by actually writing an article about her and the last Hamish Macbeth books written as M.C. Beaton. Surely it is because Hamish is my favorite of her characters in her more than 160 books although there have been many characters and books from which to choose.

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by Sharon Tucker


There is a lot to be said for young, attractive, very bright police officers in fiction. They possess boundless energy, and can usually chase, then actually catch, malefactors. However, Bill Gastner, Undersheriff of Posadas County New Mexico, has already raised a family, been widowed, and has been on the job for more years that he cares to count with retirement on the horizon. He also knows that in Posadas County, the undersheriff does the job and the sheriff is an administrator.

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Ruth Ware’s Art of Anxiety

IN THE October 26 ISSUE

FROM THE 2019 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andSharon Tucker
SECTIONS

by Sharon Tucker


The supernatural may not be a major component of Ruth Ware’s suspense novels (except for reading Tarot cards…), but her books are intense reads. The primary characters who people her novels are young professionals, successful on varying levels, who find themselves in the midst of circumstances beyond their control.

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The Tradition of Nancy Drew

IN THE September 21 ISSUE

FROM THE 2019 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andSharon Tucker,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Sharon Tucker



Nancy Drew adventures have been mainstream for over eighty years for good reason: she is our hero. It matters little that over the years these novels have had different authors writing under the pen name Carolyn Keene; what does matter is each author has carried on the original intent to give readers an intelligent, resourceful young woman who not only loves to unravel mysteries, but is very good at it, much in the tradition of the Hardy Boys, her contemporaries in stories of investigation.

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by Sharon Tucker


Dick Francis thrillers are a delight. His standalones and series detailed so many aspects of the racing world I have lost count. Moreover, in spite of the fact that I dislike gambling and competitive sports, I love his books. Sadly, Francis Senior passed away in 2010, yet the books continue to be written by his son Felix.

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by Sharon Tucker


As an academician, Robert B. Parker could have written literary fiction, criticism, or the great American novel, but lucky for us, he found a niche in crime fiction. His Spenser reinforced the admirable notion that adherence to a moral compass and accountability for one’s actions are essential to living a good life. That principle translated seamlessly when he wrote not only the Spenser novels but also his three other deeply satisfying crime series. What made Spenser such a pleasure to read holds true with his books featuring Sunny Randall, Jesse Stone, Virgil Cole, and Everett Hitch.

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by Sharon Tucker


Some commemorate St. Patrick’s Day with a pub-crawl, drinking Guinness and green beer. I think I would rather read an Irish mystery or crime novel—and just have a Guinness in tandem. S. Furlong-Bollinger’s Paddy Whacked (2011) is a brief and sprightly entry into the holiday stakes.

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by Sharon Tucker


The Dark Mirror series by Barb Hendee delivers in terms of intriguing and well-developed characters, complex plots, and the creation of a believable world. This is certainly true with her newest, A Choice of Secrets (2018), where the younger daughter of White Deer Lodge sees something happen that she should not have seen, and then has knowledge of a secret that will dramatically affect her family and their future alliances.

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by Sharon Tucker


Dennis Wheatley (1897-1977) was a best-selling British novelist for at least thirty years, and he is still quite a storyteller even by today’s standards. His black magic books are my favorites, particularly the adventures of the Duke de Richleau, in which he works to attempt restoring the monarchy in France in The Prisoner in the Mask (1957) or rescuing a friend from the designs of a Satanist in The Devil Rides Out (1934).

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by Sharon Tucker


How pleasant it is to spend a bit of time in a world without our 21st century distractions of social media, IT, traffic jams, and cell phones. Welcome back to the medieval world of Barb Hendee’s Dark Glass fantasies.

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by Sharon Tucker


When we last left our small group of scholars, soldiers, and students at the end of Ash and Quill (2017), the third in the Great Library series, we knew they had been betrayed.

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