A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Mysteryrat’s Maze

Is Bigfoot Guilty?

IN THE January 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2021 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Loretta Jackson
& Vickie Britton



Does Bigfoot really exist? Many people think so. Over one thousand sightings have been reported in Washington and California alone, and like accounts have been made from lonely, mountain areas throughout the world. In Wyoming, where our High Country Mystery series takes place, Bigfoot has been spotted many times, mostly near Yellowstone and in the Big Horn Mountains.

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Greenway: The Story Behind the Stories

IN THE January 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2021 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Gay Toltl Kinman


I visited Greenway with a Road Scholar group on their educational program “Literary England.” Yes, there is an aura about the place, and yes, Agatha Christie’s spirit was hovering around. There was no way I couldn’t write mystery stories set there. In the four stories that comprise my new book, Greenway, a scriptwriter with an American crew is filming documentaries on the Agatha Christie’s property.

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by Cynthia Chow


With over twenty installments of the charming Flower Shop mysteries under her belt, Kate Collins steers back into the adventures of Athena Spencer, first introduced in Statue of Limitations, in a mystery that earned her the nickname Goddess of Greene Street. The former Chicago newspaper reporter is unexpectedly relishing her return home to Sequoia, Michigan, where she joins her many Greek relatives who run their family-owned business.

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by Cynthia Chow
& Julie Mulhern


Former teen celebrity and current secret-spy Poppy Fields may have risked life and limb on missions through Paris, New Orleans, and Egypt, but it’s her current one that may finally push her over the edge. Poppy’s uber-famous, narcissistic mother Chariss Carlton is getting married (again), and she is demanding that her Maid-of-Honor daughter fulfill her assigned duties by finding the perfect site for her wedding shower.

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by Cynthia Chow


In the Beautiful Bird Over-55 RV Park, known to the trailer park residents as the B-Bird, the seniors of this Florida closed community are very aware of one another’s going ons and quickly take notice of anything unusual. The conclusions they make may often be a little questionable, but their innate nosiness has very recently even enabled them to solve a murder.

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New Tricks On BritBox Streaming

IN THE January 9 ISSUE

FROM THE 2021 Articles,
andKathleen Costa,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Kathleen Costa


“You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is a well-worn adage that seems better suited to illustrate cultural and generational differences than an older generation incapable of learning something new. However, maybe it is a better and more successful strategy to combine the old with the new rather than scrapping one for the other. My new find, New Tricks, has a contemporary, yet seasoned, female detective superintendent being placed in charge of three older, retired, male detectives.

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by Sharon Tucker


The best reads for many of us continue to be mysteries. For me, the mystery genre offers the challenge to discover a problem on the page then a solution that sets the world to rights again, something hard to accomplish in the world. I love the ones set in a time or place unfamiliar to me and for so long in the beginning, Golden Age Mysteries did the trick. Having read so many of those classics, after a while I looked for mystery in other times, in other genres. I’m still making discoveries and among them are the series of short novels (and one full length one) of Martha Wells, called the Murderbot Diaries: All Systems Red (2017), Artificial Condition (2018), Rogue Protocol (2018), Exit Strategy (2018), and Network Effect (2020).

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by Claire A. Murray


The 22 tales in this anthology, although inspired by the songs of the ’60s, don’t all take place in that decade. Some will step you back in time, others contemporary, all evoking the sense of the song or its meaning in tales of theft, robbery, kidnapping, dating, family, and other relationships. From the UK to Canada and the US, these authors crafted stories that range from nostalgic to humorous, but all deadly and inspired by songs whose opening riffs are mostly familiar. If not, pull out your old LPs or CDs or log onto YouTube and have a listen as you read Peace, Love, and Crime: Crime Fiction Inspired by the Songs of the ’60s.

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by Kelly Brakenhoff


Not everyone loves dogs.
Shocking statement, I know. A series of dogs have left their indelible marks on me from childhood through today. As a young girl, my constant companion was Susie our Beagle, who should have been named Houdini, because she escaped on a weekly basis. Recently, our family said goodbye to Sadie, a fifteen-year-old black Cockapoo. She grew up with our sons and daughter, entertained them with her tricks, and cuddled anyone sitting on a couch.

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by Sandra Murphy &
Cynthia Chow


We are starting off the new year with another catch up group of mysteries published over the last few months-A Deadly Edition: A Blue Ridge Library Mystery by Victoria Gilbert, A Death Long Overdue: A Lighthouse Library Mystery by Eva Gates, and Death by French Roast: A Bookstore Café Mystery by Alex Erickson.

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Stealth: A Mystery Short Story

IN THE January 2 ISSUE

FROM THE 2021 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTerrific Tales
SECTIONS

by Merrilee Robson



It was a small sound but enough to wake her. Enid listened, holding her body still, quietening her breath so she could hear.
What was that sound? The door, that was it, the soft snick of the latch. Someone had come in.

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by Sandra Murphy


Aspen Adams used to be a therapist. After the suicide of a patient, she quit her job, moved to Lake Tahoe, and worked for her Aunt Max. Max is a private investigator so Aspen started out with basic ‘you’ve been served’ work and now is a private investigator herself.

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by Kathleen Costa


The memories of the fire that killed her father, mother, and two sisters fifteen years ago have been bubbling up to the surface and more vividly since Mae had been having Reiki treatments from Tex, a “hippie, shirtless chiropractor” with whom she’d recently become acquainted. The visions have convinced her that the official determination of accident was, in fact, not, and despite concerns for her safety and many key people from the time are gone or ill, Mae is set to uncover the truth no matter what. Road trip!

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by Kathleen Costa


Haley Burke is excited, yet anxious, about her first public event as curator: a literary salon evening with author and tutor at a London college Arthur Fish. He graciously agreed to speak on “Fifty Ways to Murder,” and in exchange for the opportunity to sell his own books, he would waive his lecture fee. So, a win—win for both the First Edition Society and Fish himself.

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