A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Margaret Mendel

Baseball and Sushi

IN THE March 28 ISSUE

FROM THE 2018 Articles,
andMargaret Mendel,
andSports
SECTIONS

by Margaret Mendel


I don’t know about you, but I’ve had enough of this winter weather. I long to hear the crack of a bat and the cry, “Let’s play ball.”

{ 3 comments }

by Margaret Mendel


Pop died suddenly. There were no warnings. He had slightly elevated blood pressure and the doctor said he was pre-diabetic, but with diet and standard meds there didn’t seem to be anything to worry about. I guess when your time’s up, there’s not much you can do about it.

{ 15 comments }

by Margaret Mendel


New York City is an undeniably atmospheric place that many mystery authors find irresistible to use as a backdrop for stories and novels. I cannot even venture a guess how many murder or crime stories have been centered in any one of the five boroughs that make up this town that I call home.

{ 13 comments }

by Margaret Mendel


When I lived in the Bronx, every once in a while in the hour before the morning light leaked across the horizon of the midnight blue sky, I’d be awoken by a train whistle. I used to think it was a dream or perhaps simply my sleepy mind confusing the raggedy sound of a car horn for a Pullman. But there were no trains in that area. There hadn’t been any trains in more than a hundred years. You see I lived on the edge of Van Cortlandt Park, a haunted section of 1,000 acres that spreads out across the most northerly section of New York City in the Borough of the Bronx.

{ 16 comments }

Cinnamon: The Sweet Wood

IN THE September 10 ISSUE

FROM THE 2016 Articles,
andFood Fun,
andMargaret Mendel
SECTIONS

by Margaret Mendel


Today cinnamon is considered a common spice. But in antiquity it was a valued commodity deemed to be as precious as gold. Cinnamon was so important that the demand for it drove world exploration and countries went to war over this aromatic seasoning.

{ 3 comments }

Cranberries

IN THE November 21 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFood Fun,
andMargaret Mendel
SECTIONS

by Margaret Mendel



Cranberries are native to the mid-Atlantic region of the North American continent. These small tart berries thrive in the acidic peat soil of that region. For eons the indigenous people living in that area have used these berries for everything from cooking, to dyes for textiles, to medicines.

{ 11 comments }

by Lorie Lewis Ham


In Idyll Threats, Thomas Lynch finds himself the new chief of police in the small town of Idyll, Connecticut when he leaves the NYPD after the death of his long time partner.

{ 2 comments }

by Margaret Mendel



Amy gripped the steering wheel. Her palms were sweaty. The driving wasn’t difficult. The destination was only a couple hours drive north of San Francisco, a pretty straight run up Highway 101. It was the excitement and anticipation of what was yet to come that made her palms sweaty.

{ 13 comments }

A Short History Of The Hotdog

IN THE July 4 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFood Fun,
andMargaret Mendel
SECTIONS

by Margaret Mendel


Sausage, the precursor of the hotdog, has been around for a dog’s age. Finely chopped and highly seasoned meat stored in clean animal intestines became a clever way to preserve and store meat. This food has been around so long that it was even mentioned in Homers Odyssey written in the 9th Century BC. Italy, Portugal, Greece, France, and Germany all have long-standing recipes for sausages.

{ 9 comments }

The Tale of the Macaroons

IN THE April 4 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFood Fun,
andMargaret Mendel
SECTIONS

by Margaret Mendel


The macaroon is a tale of three cookies and dates back to Italy circa 800 B.C. with all three sweets originating from a simple mixture of eggs and almonds that had been pounded to a paste. The earliest version of this cookie was baked in the same manner as bread, in brick ovens, perhaps smothered in hot embers or cooked on a cast iron pan over an open fire. This early version of a macaroon was the perfect food for travelers and even marched off to war with the Ancient Roman Legions. These morsels were packed with protein (though back then travelers and soldiers were not aware of its nutritional value), they were easy to carry, and had, what we call in contemporary terms, a long shelf life.

{ 13 comments }

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