A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister sites Kings River Lite and KRL Reviews & News for bonus articles.


Every Other Book

by Lorie Lewis Ham


Recently we chatted with Fresno romance author and local actor, Gabriela Lawson, about her writing and her new book A Count’s Caress. Details on how to enter to win an ebook copy of A Count’s Caress at the end of this interview, along with a link to purchase the book.

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Best Books of 2014

IN THE December 27 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andEvery Other Book,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Staff



Another year is coming to a close and the main reviewers of KRL have been asked to pick their top 5 books of 2014, but most of us couldn’t keep it to 5! Let us know if you have a few we haven’t mentioned you’d like to share about in the comments, and while you are here check KRL’s book review section for many more great books that may not have made it on the list!

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


Recently a friend introduced me to Bob The Cat, probably the most famous cat out there right now besides Grumpy Cat, especially in the UK. There are two full length books about this amazing cat–A Street Cat Named Bob and How He Saved My Life, and then the more recent release of The World According to Bob. Both are written by Bob’s owner James Bowen. These books are now on the top of my list for favorite books ever!

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by Sunny Frazier


Life is not easy in 13th century England, especially if you are a cripple. Edric, our quasi-hero, is adept at begging and stealing for a living. He also has musical talent with a pipe and makes a few shillings that way as well. His whole life he has built up a defense against people, expecting rejection and getting it. All he can handle are his own needs and he has become self-centered in order to survive on the edges of society.

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Coming Full Circle

IN THE November 8 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andEvery Other Book,
andTeens
SECTIONS

by Syd Blue



I had my first flying lesson on my fourteenth birthday. What a birthday present! Now as Chief Pilot running an aviation business specializing in aerial surveillance, I fly from California to Texas, but writing was my first love. I started writing novels in the back of my parent’s small airplane when I was small enough to fit in the baggage compartment. When I was a child, my family took trips to grandma’s house in a single-engine four-seater. Since my parents had more children than seats, they put me in the baggage compartment. There was nothing to do back there. No windows. So I wrote stories and started my first book at age nine.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


Recently Joe Ozier of Fresno published his first book, a family and children’s book called Shea’s Lounge. It is based on the true story of an amazing dog named Shea, or as it says on the book cover, a runaway dog who found a forever home. Joe has written several plays in the past and been involved in theater and film for years. He also owns his own dog training business called Way of a Dog. Details on how to win a copy of Shea’s Lounge at the end of this post.

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Looking For Alaska By John Green

IN THE June 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andEvery Other Book,
andJessica Ham,
andTeens
SECTIONS

by Jessica Runnels



All of John Green’s books are wonderful but this one is one of the best. It’s unique in that it is not really a love story and is more about a young boy’s journey to “seek a great perhaps” or a great life. “Looking For Alaska” is John’s first novel and has won numerous awards. Many list it as their favorite for its unique chapter styling and intelligent protagonist.

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by Jessica Runnels



Cry, laugh, smile; that is what you will do when you read The Fault In Our Stars by John Green. John Green is my favorite author of all time. He writes the greatest young adult books I have ever read. He makes you feel like he understands you. Some adults treat teenagers or “young adults” like they are not equal and that everything they feel is silly. But John Green does not treat teenagers that way. His writing shows you that he sees all humans equally and that everyone’s feelings are valid. His writing and stories are so wonderful that adults will enjoy them as well.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham



A week and a half ago I went to the LA Times Festival of books with my daughter Jessica, my son-in-law Roy, and my “adopted” son Antonio. We hadn’t been to one of these in years but decided to make the trek this year from the Fresno area because my daughter’s favorite author, John Green, was going to be speaking there.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


As I was planning our Earth Day issue, and planning to focus again this year on ebooks, it seemed a perfect time to interview Jay Hartman. Jay is one of the founders of Untreed Reads, a company that focuses primarily on ebooks, and even in their print division uses print on demand because it is more Earth friendly.

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by Angelo DiGangi


Readers of all ages understand how attached we can become to the books we love. We hang on to them for decades, rereading them over and over again whenever we feel the need to reconnect with old friends or glean inspiration. Even in this day of online reading and tablets that can store tens of thousands of titles, there’s just something about a physical hard copy of a book that feels like home.

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Winter’s Tale: Book Review

IN THE February 15 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andEvery Other Book,
andTess Mize
SECTIONS

by Tess Mize



This review was inspired by a list of movies coming out in 2014 that are based on books. Having seen a few trailers for the movies on the list, I saw Winter’s Tale and thought, “That seems like a nice, romantic story–perfect to review in time for Valentine’s Day.” Based on the movie trailer, I expected an easy read, with sentimentality to rival any Nicholas Sparks books and a dash of fantasy. What I got was a 768-page mammoth of a novel by Mark Helprin that proved a very challenging, and at times frustrating, exercise of the mind.

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by David Kulczyk


Quite possibly the first hippie in California, eden ahbez, better known as Nature Boy, was born on April 15, 1908, in Brooklyn, New York, to a Jewish family, but according to ahbez, he was adopted by a family from Kansas when he was nine years old. He moved to Los Angeles in the early 1940s, where he hung out at the raw-food restaurant and health-food store Eutropheon, on Laurel Canyon Boulevard.

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Dead Set By Richard Kadrey

IN THE January 4 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andEvery Other Book,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andJesus Ibarra
SECTIONS

by Jesus Ibarra


Richard Kadrey, best known for his Sandman Slim urban fantasy series, enters the world of YA fiction with Dead Set. Not a completely unexpected thing, as YA fiction has become an incredibly popular genre, with almost every popular urban fantasy author writing a YA novel. However, Dead Set strangely does not read or feel like a YA adult novel. It doesn’t focus on a lot of the current YA tropes such teenage romance, someone finding their destiny and or trying to save the world. Kadrey avoids these trappings by making Dead Set all about dealing with grief– specifically the grief of the teenage character, Zoe, who is still mourning the loss of her father.

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by KRL Reviewers


KRL reviewed a lot of really good and great books in 2013, but we decided to give our best shot at choosing our top 5 of the year–some of us cheated a little, but here are our choices! And if you are an author who is not on the list, take heart–like I said, they were all good books!

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Bite This Book By Lony Ruhmann

IN THE November 9 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andEvery Other Book,
andPets
SECTIONS

by Carol Upton



Lony Ruhmann is one of those rare people who decided to nurse an adopted pup with distemper back from the brink. Lony’s first dog, Juve, was that pup. Many people would have given up in the face of such a deadly disease, but Lony chose not to do that. Instead, he spoke, read and sang to Juve, sending reassurance that no one was going to give up on him. “Seventy-five percent of puppies diagnosed with distemper do not survive”, says Lony. “Juve did.”

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