legal thriller

The Bomb Maker’s Son By Robert Rotstein

by Cyntha Chow


Having previously been attacked in his condo’s underground garage, attorney Parker Stern is prepared for the worst when he’s startled there by a woman with a covered face. For Parker, an actual beating would have been preferable to a visit by his mother Harriet. Now calling herself Quiana Gottshalk, she’s a self-declared elder of the Church of the Sanctified Assembly, a cult that abused and embezzled money from Parker while he was a child actor.

Flinch Factor: A Rachel Gold Mystery by Michael A. Kahn: Review/Interview/Giveaway

by Cynthia Chow


Since attorney Rachel Gold's last appearance in 2002's The Trophy Widow, life has been both a blessing and a curse. Although she is now the stepmother of two teenaged girls and the proud mother of Sam, only two when his father and Rachel's husband Jonathan died just four years ago. Rachel has not been raising Sam alone though, as she has the full support of her mother and Benny Goldberg, the brilliant and profane tenured law professor and her former coworker at the Chicago law firm, Abbot and Windsor. Rachel now practices law in St. Louis at her own private firm, Brand and Gold, with her ex-paralegal and now a full attorney, the six foot three, formerly male pro football player, Jacki Brand.

Corrupt Practices By Robert Rotstein: Review/Guest Post/Giveaway

by Cynthia Chow
& Robert Rotstein


Parker Stern was a brilliant and relentless litigator until news of his mentor Harmon Cherry’s suicide triggers paralyzing stage fright. Appearances in the court room now induce panic attacks and render him nearly incoherent, so only a plea from his former law partner Rich Baxter and the guilt-inducing pressure from his other former partner Deanna Poulos have the chance of drawing him back into the legal field.

Dante’s Wood: A Mark Angelotti Novel By Lynne Raimondo: Book Review/Guest Post/Giveaway

by Cynthia Chow


For the last thirteen months, clinical psychiatrist Mark Angelotti has been losing his vision. A devastating genetic disorder began to rob him of his sight at the age of forty-six, and despite what the inspirational back–to-school specials and true life television movies would have one believe, suddenly becoming disabled has not made Mark noble, admirable, or humble.

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