A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


fiction

It’s Only Fair: An Animal Short Story

IN THE April 6 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andPets,
andTerrific Tales
SECTIONS

by Maryetta Ackenbom


I woke up from a comfortable night in my old bed, in my old home, to the smell of bacon frying, and the sounds of—a struggle?—just outside the front door.
Wide awake, I scrambled out of bed and to the door. My mother, two days out of the hospital after bypass surgery, stood on the porch, trying to help her black chow dog down the steps.

{ 0 comments }

New Baseball

IN THE March 30 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andTerrific Tales
SECTIONS

by Herschel Cozine


I was eleven years old. Living as I did in a small town with houses separated by acres of farmland, I had no birthday party. But my family was there. And cake and ice cream. And presents.

{ 0 comments }

by Gail Farrelly


Make no mistake. It’s not a “peep” show.
Take your mind out of the gutter and see that we’re talking about peeps. Y’know those soft marshmallow candies (yellow chickens and pink bunnies are the most popular) that folks either love or love to hate. Less creative people buy them to stuff into Easter baskets. Not Lady Gaga. She bought boxes and boxes of them and ordered her designers to make a dress (with shoes and a matching shawl) out of them.

{ 0 comments }

by Miranda Lara


My hand was trembling in a spasm. My pencil was shaking side to side and my eyes focused on the lined piece of paper. “One Day,” it read. One day, what? One day I could become a hot pop star singing in New York Square on New Year’s Eve, paparazzi crying to get a shot of me and fans bursting with tears when they find out my concert is sold out from the last bar ticket.

{ 3 comments }

by Madeline McEwen


Lucas agreed to foster care until Mom finished Chemo, that was only fair, but it wasn’t fair to pick on Piecrust. So what if he was ornery. Fourteen feline years meant eighty human years. He’d already used up more than twenty of his nine lives, at least. Lucas swore he could live forever, but a few weeks in a cattery would kill him. Lucas couldn’t take the chance and vowed to keep him safe.

{ 7 comments }

by Gail Farrelly


When Mars rover Curiosity sent back images of soil with sparkling flecks in it, at first NASA scientists were stumped. But they kept on digging. Finally, they were able to explain those sparkles. The scientists came to the inescapable conclusion that it was gold dust that had been left on Mars by leprechauns.

{ 0 comments }

by Peter DiChellis



Olivia felt sick with worry. Something awful had happened. She just didn’t know what.
She’d called the police. Oh, what they must have thought of her. A lonely old woman in a wheelchair, imagining the worst. Kidnapping or murder. Or at least a horrible accident for goodness sakes! All because her dear friend, Ted Strosen, was missing.

{ 0 comments }

Lunch Break: A Mystery Short Story

IN THE February 16 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTerrific Tales
SECTIONS

by Lesley A. Diehl



“My old lady send that crap in my lunch box, she’d be wearing my fist in her eye.” Ralph watched Ben fold back a corner of his sandwich, look at the contents and grimace.
“Peanut butter and jelly. Not so bad. Anyway, Myra didn’t make it. I did.” Ben took a large bite out of the white bread and washed it down with a slug of coffee from his thermos. He coughed as the dry bread and peanut butter stuck in his throat and gulped more coffee to dislodge the lump.

{ 4 comments }

by Mary Frisbee


Granger sat on the warm hood of his Ford coupe, trying to keep his ass from freezing. Looking out over the matte black of the Montana prairie to the faint bar of gray light along the horizon, he pulled the collar of his parka higher and tucked in the strings of the orange cotton hunting vest fluttering in the slight breeze.

{ 0 comments }

by Jonette Stabbert



Bootsy was small but strong; all those workouts in the gym kept her lithe and muscled. Nonetheless, dragging a dead man through the woods was hard work and she was relieved when she finally reached the clearing that the summer people used for campfires.

{ 9 comments }

by Barry Ergang



The vision of Ramona Braithwaite in ecstasy over her accommodations at the Forest Grove Inn warmed the profit-minded hearts of Lainie Truscott and her husband Frank, owners of the bed-and-breakfast. The wealthy, widowed Mrs. Braithwaite in a state of distress induced a polar opposite effect. On that Tuesday morning after the Memorial Day holiday, an icy climate settled over the Inn when Mrs. Braithwaite reported her diamond-and-ruby bracelet missing. She made the mistake—in the owners’ view, at any rate—of mentioning the fact to the other guests, all of whom immediately took stock of their own valuables.

{ 4 comments }

by Jim Cort



“Jolly old Saint Nicholas, lean your ear this way. Don’t you tell a single soul what I’m going to say.”
“So my kid says, ‘I don’t think there is any Santa Claus.’” Detective Sergeant Stan Gawecki ate the last of his cruller and took another sip of coffee from the paper cup.

{ 4 comments }

Ghostly Encounter: A Christmas Short Story

IN THE December 17 ISSUE

FROM THE 2012 Articles,
andTerrific Tales
SECTIONS

by Herschel Cozine


I was ten years old. That was a long time ago, before television and all of the electronic gimmickry that permeate today’s world. We, my younger brother, Timmy and I, got our entertainment by listening to the radio, usually with the lights out as Inner Sanctum and some of the old, classic radio programs scared us out of our wits. Cool! There was nothing like a good scary radio program in the dark to get one’s creative juices flowing. Some of the best, deliciously awful pranks I pulled on Timmy were inspired while listening to the radio.

{ 1 comment }

by Ron Van Sweringen



All of the animals in the forest, dressed in their warm winter furs, sat looking up at the starless sky. Even the wise old owl in the oak tree, ruffled his feathers in discontent, ignoring the little field mouse sitting on the branch beside him.

{ 1 comment }

  • Arts & Entertainment

  • Books & Tales

  • Community

  • Education

  • Food Fun

  • Helping Hands

  • Hometown History

  • Pets

  • Teens

  • Terrific Tales