A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Covid 19

by Lise McClendon


How to wring something positive out of one huge negative—that was the challenge I set for myself this spring. America, and the world, had shut down, locked down, were sheltering in place like victims of a mass shooting. But this enemy was invisible. The coronavirus, COVID-19, had arrived.

{ 0 comments }

Musicians in the Time of Covid

IN THE June 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMallory Moad,
andMusic
SECTIONS

by Mallory Moad



Here we are in the 12th week of the COVID-19 pandemic and the accompanying shutdown, with a return to normal—whatever that was—still far away. We’ve worked from home, done our best to keep our kids mentally stimulated without going flat-out mental ourselves, practiced social distancing on those rare occasions when we braved going out in public, and embraced facial coverings as a fashion accessory.

{ 0 comments }

by Tom Sims



Let me start with this. Many things have been closed that have never been closed before:
Doctor’s offices.
Stores and restaurants. Beauty Salons and barbers.

{ 1 comment }

Life in the Time of Covid 19

IN THE May 16 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andCommunity,
andMaria Ruiz
SECTIONS

by Maria Ruiz



I had never heard of it before March, 2020. First, the talk was all about coronavirus. I looked it up on Google and found that most influenzas were coronaviruses. Well, I don’t get any flu easily so I didn’t worry. Then, they found that this is a new virus, one that no one has any immunity for.

{ 2 comments }

In Praise of the Backyard Garden

IN THE May 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Eve Calder


Lately I’ve been craving a little time in the backyard garden. The only problem: I have neither. Not a backyard. And definitely nothing that qualifies as a “garden.” Unless you count the cluster of bamboo plants in my sunny living room. And, between you and me, they looked a lot healthier before I brought them home from the store.

{ 0 comments }

The Greatest Detectives of All

IN THE May 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Ang Pompano


Thanks so much to Lorie Lewis Ham for inviting me here today. Over the years, I’ve written about many detectives in my short stories. All of them, both male and female, were in some way classic damaged gumshoes. Al DeSantis and his father, Big Al, in my debut novel, When It’s Time for Leaving, are no exceptions. Al and his father have history and not all of it is good.

{ 4 comments }

Imagining a Dark Tomorrow

IN THE May 6 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Reece Hirsch


When I wrote my thriller Dark Tomorrow, I thought I had imagined a true worst-case scenario, one in which the entire East Coast was crippled by a massive cyber attack launched by an unknown enemy. In my book, the electrical grid is shut down, supply chains grind to a halt, our national defense system is hacked, and industrial plants are turned into terrorist weapons.

{ 4 comments }

Getting Along in the Pandemic

IN THE April 29 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Elizabeth Zelvin


Thank goodness my husband and I have learned to get along together in time to be cooped up together in our New York City apartment during the pandemic. It could have been disastrous, even dangerous, because we both agree that we’re completely incompatible. I thought a new tank top billed by the retailer as dove gray had a purple tint to it.

{ 0 comments }

by Terrance McArthur


I’m sheltering in place…sort-of. I went back to work for three days at the beginning of April, but I decided to take four weeks of leave (I have plenty of hours). I thought I could be productive during my time off, but…I have cooked. Let me tell you about the latest dishes to come out of Casa de Mc Arthur….

{ 0 comments }

by Dorothy McFalls


I don’t know about you, but I’m feeling stressed. The uncertainty of the quarantine, worrying about doing a good job homeschooling my daughter who is in first grade, and wondering how I should dress to buy food has put me in such a tizzy that it’s become nearly impossible for me to write. And writing is not only my full-time job, it’s my vocation.

{ 6 comments }

by Vicki Vass


Like most of you, I am practicing social distancing from my home. For me this is not too far out of the ordinary. As a writer, I have been predominantly work at home for most of my career, but I do enjoy getting out every once in a while and seeing the world. I wanted to share some tidbits from my three plus week homestay.

{ 11 comments }

Embracing Technology

IN THE April 11 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Lynn Chandler Willis


Could you imagine going through the COVID-19 pandemic fifty years ago? Twenty years ago? How about ten years ago? Our ways of communication has greatly increased in just the last ten years. FaceTime went live June 7, 2010. We’ve all seen the commercials and the pictures of people, mainly kids, on their various handheld techno gadgets and rolled our eyes. How many times have you said, or wanted to say, “get off your phone and go outside!”

{ 9 comments }

Writing in the Time of Pestilence

IN THE April 8 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Betty Webb


Sounds like a Gabriel Garcia Marquez title, doesn’t it? Well, I’m certainly no Marquez, and I’ve always been more logical than romantic, but these last couple of weeks have already taught me a few things.

{ 2 comments }

Holy Helpers

IN THE April 4 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andCommunity,
andTom Sims
SECTIONS

by Tom Sims



Recently, I became aware of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. I was thinking about the lesson that Fred Rogers would teach children about how to cope with profound crisis. He said to look for the helpers because there were always helpers. Sometimes they we teachers, sometimes police officers or doctors and nurses. Sometimes they were neighbors, but there were always going to be helpers and the helpers would help.

{ 1 comment }

  • Arts & Entertainment

  • Books & Tales

  • Community

  • Education

  • Food Fun

  • Helping Hands

  • Hometown History

  • Pets

  • Teens

  • Terrific Tales