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Easy Like Sunday Morning

IN THE August 8 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andAnimal Rescue Adventures,
andLee Juslin
SECTIONS

by Lee Juslin

When Cody was turned into a New York City shelter by his owners, the shelter thought he was a Wheaten Scottie. So, they sent pictures to Scottie Rescue of Greater New York. Meanwhile, the shelter kept him isolated to avoid his picking up kennel cough and other illnesses, which are common in shelters. When the rescue agreed to take him, the shelter had him vetted and brought up to date on his vaccines. They, then, delivered him to Erica, a volunteer with the rescue.

As it turned out, Erica realized Cody, though looked like a Scottie, was really a white Schnauzer. “We’ve had several white Schnauzers, so I recognized the signs pretty quickly,” said Erica. White Schnauzers are the rarest coloring for Schnauzers. They come from breeding a Schnauzer to a Westie. But, without the typical Schnauzer ear and tail cropping, they do look like Wheaten Scotties. When Cody is sitting quietly, his ears are straight up, but, when he walks, they tend to flop over. Erica says they look a lot like Pooh Bear’s ears.

Cody

Cody has some medical issues such as two fatty growths which are probably not cancerous but will need to be checked. In addition, he has bad teeth and is on antibiotics until Erica can get him into the vet. Due to the Covid virus, it takes longer to get a vet appointment, and he will need two visits. One visit will be to take blood work, and the second will be for the dental and the removal of the fatty growths. He will be fully vetted before being put up for adoption.

Cody weighs about twenty-three pounds and is estimated to be ten-years-old. Schnauzers often live to their mid-teens, so Cody has the potential for a good life ahead. He is active and very friendly. He gets along with children and even tolerates cats, both unusual for rescue dogs. He likes to play and has shown some interest in toys. His easy-going personality shows that, though his family turned him into the shelter due to family problems, he was obviously loved and not abused.

This happy little boy would make a good companion for an older person who could walk him and play with him. He would not be happy with someone who is away all day. He walks well on a leash and enjoys meeting people and other dogs. He would also enjoy visits from grandchildren. Erica says that he is an easy boy and will be a great catch for some lucky adopter.

Learn more about Cody and his pals in Scottie Rescue, volunteer, apply to adopt a rescue, or make a very needed donation. During this time of the Covid virus, rescue organizations need even more help with financial donations and volunteers. If you want to volunteer, you can become a foster parent or help with transporting. Scottie Rescue of Great NY is a 501C 3 entity so donations are tax deductible.

Visit the Greater NY/NJ Scottie Rescue on their Facebook page or their website:

Website: Scottie Rescue
Facebook: Scottie Rescue on FB

Check out more animal rescue stories in our Pet Perspective section & watch for more stories. You can also keep up with our pet articles by joining our KRL Facebook group.

Want to know how to see your ad like this at the end of an article? Email KRL at life@kingsriverlife[dot]com by replacing the [dot] for more info. 10% of all ad sales goes to animal rescue.

Lee Juslin is a free lance copywriter living in North Carolina with her husband, Scott, and her band of misfits: Tarquin, a Wheaten Scottish Terrier, and three handicapped cats. They can be seen on their website: Hampshire Hooligans. She owns I B Dog Gone, a small embroidery business and is the author of the Nurse Frosty books for children and Frosty’s Story: Tales of a Therapy Dog. She supports a number of national and regional terrier rescue organizations.

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Carol August 9, 2020 at 9:59am

Enjoyed reading this and learning how much love and attention are directed to rescue animals.

Reply

2 William B Schinella August 9, 2020 at 12:08pm

I wish I had the time to take care of that very cute puppy, but I already have 2 scottish terriers and they are very demanding to say the least!

Reply

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