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Reedley High At Home

IN THE May 16 ISSUE

FROM THE 2020 Articles,
andEducation,
andTeens
SECTIONS

by Asami Nelson

Although Reedley High made the difficult decision to close campus for the rest of the school year amid concerns about student and public health, teachers and staff are still working to continue providing students with quality education. Classes have shifted from the classroom to computers and phones with the use of a variety of apps. Google Classroom provides students with a way to virtually access assignments, notes, and ensure that they are completing tasks. The Zoom app has also been used to conduct meetings among clubs, classes, and among peers themselves. AP students have also switched to online AP tests this year, with the College Board providing resources for the most efficient testing experience possible with 45-minutes per exam instead of the usual three hours.

Google Classroom is the primary application used by both teachers and students for remote learning.

Kirby Kauk is the teacher for the Human Anatomy and Sports Medicine classes at Reedley High. Although his classes have always provided access to notes and resources online, the shift to complete remote learning has also been difficult for his lessons. “Having to supply everything online and make everything available online to students is difficult because not everyone has unlimited access to the internet and a printer. Not having interaction with everyone in person is difficult. I’ve been trying my best to send out reminders and all of the skills and the labs, but not being able to do all that stuff is disappointing. The kids cannot work on hands-on activities, which are impossible to do remotely. It also depends on the class. I believe my class is going well because everyone was used to accessing everything online before this happened.”

Studying for the upcoming AP Calculus exam.

Reedley High student Mikayla Reyna describes the effects of school closure from the perspective of a graduating senior, “The teachers – bless their hearts – are trying so hard to provide adequate teaching for us, but there is only so much they can teach over the phone or a computer. The major obstacle I’ve faced is trying to communicate with my teachers and classmates to be able to understand and ask questions about material we are learning. Zoom meetings and emails have helped establish communication, however for people, such as myself, who learn through audio, it’s very difficult to learn material based off of only assignments on google classroom and reading passages. I’ve also overall missed going to school. As a senior I thought I would have been spending this time counting down the days until school is done, awaiting the minute I can leave the school, but instead I am longing to return to the classes I used to complain about. I miss being able to talk to my friends and teachers and the routine school provided in my life. I miss study sessions with my friends and the weird rallies we had to go to. I even miss finals week because, even though it causes a lot of stress, it brought me and my peers together because we were all stressing together and helping each other through it all. Now we are having finals online but are having to face it alone. Overall this whole online learning, though I understand necessary due to the coronavirus, has not been fun for me and I am counting down the days until I can see people again and hug them without panicking about germs.”

Reedley High will provide a “virtual graduation” on May 28, the date of the original graduation that was to be held at the football stadium on campus. Over 300 graduates have been pre-recorded with their cap and gowns along with awards such as Pirate Pillar, salutatorian, and valedictorian. Those attending a four-year college or university have also been recognized for their achievements. These students have worked diligently for their accomplishments, and will continue to persevere through these difficult times.

Asami Nelson is 17, a senior, and hopes to attend Stanford University as a Biology major, planning to become a microbiologist.

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