A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister sites Kings River Lite and KRL News & Reviews for bonus articles.


thriller

by Theodore Feit


Turning her attention away from the long-standing series featuring Decker and Lazarus, Faye Kellerman has written a standalone involving a serial killer and rapist, a teenager obsessed with finding the murderer, first love, and hanky-panky goings-on in high school. It makes for good reading throughout the rather bulky book.

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The Party Line By Karen Alkofer

IN THE November 18 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andChristopher Lewis,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Christopher Lewis



“Living in a country torn apart by a revolution gives you a different perspective on the lessons you learn in history class,” says Lizzie, the main protagonist in Karen Alkofer’s first novel, The Party Line. It’s a young adult novel with an insightful twist. In addition to providing an interesting story, this book also gives the reader a different perspective than the lessons you learn in history class.

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by Sandra Murphy



For readers who love Theodosia, Drayton, and Haley from the Tea Shop books, Carmela and Ava from the scrapbook series, and Suzanne, Petra, and Toni from the Cackleberry Club, this is a departure from the cozy mysteries you’re used to. Schmitt (Laura Childs’ real name) has turned to thrillers. Her first, Little Girl Gone, is about a kidnapped baby. Shadow Girl is the second, and it starts with a bang, literally.

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by Doward Wilson



Meet PI Roxane Weary. She is dealing with her cop father’s recent death on the job by trying to drink herself into oblivion every day. As her bank account runs low, her brother sends her his friend who is trying to save her brother from execution. Fifteen years ago Brad Stockton’s beautiful blonde girlfriend, Sarah Cook, disappeared, and her parents were brutally murdered. No trace of her has been found since that night until Brad’s sister tells Roxane that she saw her at a neighborhood gas station and begs Roxane to try and find her and get her brother acquitted.

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by Sharon Tucker


Barry Lancet’s Japantown (2016) introduced readers to Asian art dealer/Japanese detective agency owner Jim Brodie and both his divergent firms—one in San Francisco, the other in Tokyo—readily making available a cornucopia of possible plots that could occur in the US or Japan, or both, and by no means restricted to either locale. Lancet followed this intriguing debut with Tokyo Kill (2015), in which a veteran Japanese soldier comes to Brodie in Tokyo, certain that his friends and former unit are systematically being murdered, putting a WWII twist to the plot and making readers wonder to what degree Japanese culture still labors under the weight of that particular history.

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by Sandra Murphy


Chase Day is a history professor, former Navy, and presumably an orphan, raised by his grandmother. His mother was killed in a fire over thirty years ago. He never knew who his father was. His mother abused drugs and alcohol so her mothering skills were spotty at best. He also coaches veterans in an art therapy class, getting them to put their problems on the canvas. It’s helped him although no one would call him an artist.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham


Local filmmaker Matt Sconce’s new film Altar will have its red carpet premiere on May 13 at the Crest Theatre in Fresno. We took a moment to chat with him about his film.

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by Sharon Tucker


Of course, it doesn’t hurt that author Barry Lancet had years of publishing experience behind him, as well as years of living in Japan before he began writing his Jim Brodie thrillers. He had an insider’s advantage navigating the choppy waters of approach letters, choosing a literary agent, and a clear knowledge of what worked on the page. This and his deep appreciation of Japanese arts and culture must have presented an irresistible formula for writing novels to anyone so inclined.

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by Marilyn Meredith


What a perfectly titled book. The young woman and heroine, Chessa Paxton, is accused of murdering her husband, and run she does, and run and run and run. Not only is she running from the detectives on the case, but from many of those who might be the real killer.

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by Terrance Mc Arthur


Van Shaw was raised to steal by criminals like his grandfather Dono, and taught to kill by Uncle Sam. Now, he is out of the Rangers, and a friend of his grandfather’s wants him to find his niece Luce, Van’s old girlfriend, who wasn’t quite, who was running with a high-rent crowd. What Van finds is pretty grisly in Hard Cold Winter by Glen Erik Hamilton.

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by Cynthia Chow


Maureen Keslyn knew that her recovery after a horrific shooting wouldn’t be pleasant. After spending three weeks in a hospital, she didn’t expect that her husband would have already moved a replacement into her home. Pride has Maureen without living arrangements and not yet ready for retirement, so what initially seemed like an unappealing proposition, now has its merits.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham



This weekend I experienced a theatre marathon, seeing three shows that all fit in perfectly with the Halloween season! First was Dracula at COS, then The Rocky Horror Show at the Ice House in Visalia, and lastly the suspenseful thriller Wait Until Dark at the Reedley Opera House.

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by Cyntha Chow


The one thing Tennyson Olivia Claxton remembers is that her eyes are green. So why are the ones she sees staring back at her in the mirror brown? As she recovers from a car accident in “The Campus,” Tennyson struggles to remember multiple sets of memories that fade in and out every day. Her doctor, Giles Embry, regiments her every movement and interaction, telling Tennyson that she cannot trust her own thoughts—but that she can trust him. Even in her confused state, Tennyson knows that something is not right with their relationship, especially seeing as she’s apparently his fiancé.

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Killing Secrets By Dianne Emley

IN THE August 1 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andCynthia Chow,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Cyntha Chow


Pasadena Police Detective Nan Vining should have been spending the day taking a midterm for the college degree she was finally pursuing. Instead, Nan has been called to a double homicide scene (and her teenaged daughter Emily was the first to arrive). Emily’s beloved young teacher, Erica Keller, has been stabbed to death, presumably by Jared Hayword, another student—the other body next to hers.

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