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Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister sites Kings River Lite and KRL News & Reviews for bonus articles.


Sci-Fi

Designated Survivor: TV Review

IN THE March 4 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Doward Wilson


Tom Kirkman (played by Kiefer Sutherland) is the U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. On the night of the State of the Union address, he is named the Designated Survivor and is sequestered. When multiple explosions demolish the Capitol building, killing the President, Vice-President, all the other members of the Cabinet and every member of Congress, Tom is sworn in as the President. Moving swiftly to contain the damage and take control of the situation, Tom is surprised to find that the GOP also had a Designated Survivor in the person of Kimble Hookstraten (played by Virginia Madsen), a Republican Congresswoman.

{ 2 comments }

by Terrance McArthur



Take the episodic style of Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, add the close quarters of Alfred Hitchcock’s Lifeboat, throw in pirates and politicians, and set it out in a not-always-friendly galaxy, and you have Becky Chambers’ The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet.

{ 4 comments }

by Terrance Mc Arthur



There’s an old joke among librarians, “Public libraries would be so much better if we could just get rid of the public.” What if…the world was ruled by the Library, private ownership of books was a death-penalty crime, and books and authors that went against Library interpretations of what should and should not be known disappeared, frequently?

{ 5 comments }

Equals: A New Type of Sci-Fi Film?

IN THE June 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2016 Articles,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andMovies
SECTIONS

by Maria Rosemary


Utopian themes have always been a part of the sci-fi genre, but in recent decades the dystopian world is quickly taking its place. From the brutal matches of The Hunger Games to the classically sinister tones of 12 Monkeys, dystopian world views have quickly become the norm for filmmakers. Case in point, the unique and sometimes disturbing elements found in the 2015 film Equals. This fascinating yet flawed case study, produced by A24 Films and DirecTV, highlights everything that’s right and wrong about this thriving genre.

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by Maria Rosemary


The 5th Wave is the latest in dystopian science fiction thrillers that originally began as a young adult book series. What sets it apart from its compatriots is the method by which society falls apart. Playing off today’s fears of disease, climate change and failing infrastructure in a way that is both relatable and chilling, the invading aliens responsible for the destruction come as a mere afterthought as the chaos and drama unfolds.

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by Terrance Mc Arthur



Science fiction, fantasy, and paranormal books are all about world-building, creating an alternate reality with details that try to make them consistent and…real. In City of Light, Keri Arthur has built a reality, world, and history that takes the impossible and makes it matter-of-fact to at least one character Tiger, a seductress-spy who should have died a hundred years ago in the shifter/human war if it hadn’t been for the test-tube mix of shifter, vampire, and tiger DNA that had been dosed with an immunity to all known poisons. She can change body shape and scent, read other people’s minds during sex, travel swiftly as molecules in darkness, and has acquired massive combat skills over the last century of practice.

{ 4 comments }

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

IN THE December 28 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andCynthia Chow,
andMovies
SECTIONS

by Cynthia Chow


Rest assured.Star Wars: The Force Awakens was made for those of us who loved the original Star Wars Trilogy but prefer to pretend the Prequels never existed. Almost more of a soft reboot than a continuation (which it is, taking place thirty years after the events of Return of the Jedi), J.J. Abrams plays homage to everything we loved about the first movies without hitting us over the head with the references (as he frequently did in Star Trek Into the Darkness).

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by Maria Ramos


It has been nearly 20 years since the last time a Star Wars trilogy was kicked off and on December 17, we will be treated to The Force Awakens. Despite general disappointment with the prequel trilogy, the hype for Episode VII is at a fever pitch, not least because it promises a blending of what worked about the original series and some incredible new ideas and characters—many of which (like BB-8) are already beloved.

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Mockingjay Part 2: Movie Review

IN THE November 30 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andJessica Ham,
andMovies
SECTIONS

by Jessica Ham



Check out our video review of Mockingjay Part 2, and a coupon for Dinuba Platinum Theatres.

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Breakout By Ann Aguirre

IN THE September 26 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andTerrance V. Mc Arthur
SECTIONS

by Terrance Mc Arthur



In Ann Aguirre’s Breakout, Perdition is a space station used as a penitentiary for life-sentenced offenders. They were dumped there and sent supply ships. Free to develop their own societies, they developed gangs that ranged from cannibals to tongue less ninjas.

{ 1 comment }

by Deborah Harter Williams


Fluff up your pillows, lay in some snacks—here are some tempting new shows kicking off and spinning off next week.

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Insurgent: Movie Review

IN THE March 25 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFantasy & Fangs,
andJessica Ham,
andMovies
SECTIONS

by Jessica Ham



I love the Divergent book series so I was very excited for the second installment in the movie franchise. The first movie was faithful to the book almost completely so I knew the director knew what he was doing. >em>Insurgent was an intense, romantic, and amazing movie and I could gush about it for hours. There were some parts of the book they left out but the basic storyline still rang true.

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by Marilyn Meredith
& Frankie Bailey



This week we have a review of sci-fi/mystery novel What the Fly Saw by Frankie Bailey, along with an interesting guest post about death rituals from Frankie. Details at the end of this post on how to win a copy of the book.

{ 2 comments }

Vacant By Alex Hughes

IN THE February 28 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andFantasy & Fangs
SECTIONS

by Mary Anne Barker


Vacant is number four in the science fiction Mindspace Investigations series. The story takes place in the future in Atlanta, Georgia. There are people who have certain mental powers, and Adam is a telepath. Most of those who have developed powers like telepathy belong to the Guide, but Adam was thrown out for drug use.

{ 2 comments }

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