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Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. If you love mysteries — explore Mysteryrat’s Maze — and check out our sister site on Blogger for bonus articles.


Kathleen Kaska

by Kathleen Kaska


You’re suspected of murder. Your alibi might be just a figment of your imagination–or so say the authorities. Another investigator appears to be interfering with you trying to prove your innocence. Your love interest and her brother, her father and two archeologists all have motives, but Scotland Yard stays focused on you. You’ve been in a pickle before, but a certain beekeeper has always saved your skin. So when another murder is committed and you, again, are the prime suspect, well even Sherlock Holmes may not be able to rescue you.

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The Liberation of Mary in Sherlock Holmes

IN THE February 28 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Kathleen Kaska



In Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes novel, The Sign of Four, Mary Morstan arrived on Holmes’s doorstep seeking help solving the mysterious disappearance of her father, Captain Arthur Morstan. Upon her entrance to 221B Baker Street, Watson described her as having a firm step and composed manner.

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Murder at the Driskill By Kathleen Kaska

IN THE February 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Dan Andriacco



One of the strengths of the mystery genre is that it comes in all shapes and sizes, from romantic suspense to noir. In her Sydney Lockhart series of hotel mysteries, though, Kathleen Kaska has created something special with a mash-up of screwball comedy (think 1930s movies), and Texas noir. The fourth serving of this unusual blend is the best yet.

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by Sunny Frazier




Whew! Bouchercon is over! I put out a call to all my mystery sources for December releases. Enough authors responded to fill Santa’s sack with plenty of good books.

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by Kathleen Kaska
& Dan Andriacco



This week we have a review of Dan Andriacco’s latest Enoch Hale mystery The Poisoned Penman, along with a really fun guest post from Dan about Sherlock Holmes, who makes an appearance in the book. His post is called The Iconic Sleuth. You can also find details on how to win a copy of The Poisoned Penman and a link to purchase the book (a portion of all sales from this link go to help support KRL).

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by Kathleen Kaska



When I first met Sebastian McCabe, Jeff Cody and Lynda Teal, (No Police Like Holmes) life was rocking along in the college town of Erin, Ohio. Getting to know these delightful characters, created by author Dan Andriacco, resulted in my putting this series on my “always-read” list. That was three books ago and I’m delighted to report that the murder-solving Sherlockian trio is back, this time in London. They are searching for the infamous Mr. James Phillimore who, as many of your Holmes fanatics know, went back into his house for an umbrella and disappeared.

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by Kathleen Kaska



I love reading Sherlock Holmes pastiches. For generations clever writers have taken Holmes and sent him around the world, into the future, the past, into outer space, and even to Texas. They’ve made him a teenager, a woman, a Jack Russell terrier, a rat; given him a wife, a female Dr. Watson, and an alien as a partner. He’s battled Martians, vampires, and Jack the Ripper.

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Agatha, Arthur, and Alfred

IN THE April 27 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Kathleen Kaska



Did you ever stop and think where we’d be today without Agatha Christie, Alfred Hitchcock, and Arthur Conan Doyle? We would never have had the pleasure of Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot, Dr. Watson, Sherlock Holmes or even Norman Bates’ company.

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by Kathleen Kaska



I love the ocean; the sea; the coast at any time of year. I don’t care if it is hot, humid, or blustery as long as it is a large body of salt water where I can look out toward that illusive, mystical horizon. I first dug my toes into the sand on the Gulf Coast in Galveston, Texas when I was six. It was on a family summer vacation; my bathing suit was navy blue with tiny white polka dots; my hair was in pigtails, and my little sister sat on a mound of sand surrounded by my handmade mote I was filling with salt water from my bucket.

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by Kathleen Kaska



What do Leonard Nimoy, John Cleese, Roger Moore, Jeremy Brett, Robert Downey Jr., and Wishbone The Dog have in common? Along with dozens of other actors, they’ve portrayed Sherlock Holmes in movies and TV episodes based on Arthur Conan Doyle’s original Holmes stories.

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by Kathleen Kaska



I’ve often wondered about the profundity of one of the most famous quotes from Arthur Conan Doyle’s entire Canon. Was Holmes aware he was destined to become the world’s greatest detective? Did he know his name would become a household word synonymous with clever, deductive reasoning? That he would live on forever? My guess is he probably did.

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Alfred Hitchcock: With All Due Respect

IN THE August 18 ISSUE

FROM THE 2012 Articles,
andMovies,
andMysteryrat's Maze
SECTIONS

by Kathleen Kaska



Film directing in the 1930s was a series of peaks and valleys for British-born Alfred Hitchcock. By 1939, the Master of Suspense had directed twenty-three films in his homeland; but with success came frustration. He was under contract with British International Pictures, and forced to accept film projects that were not to his liking. Many were simply adaptations of novels and plays, and his creativity was stifled by restrictions placed upon him by studio executives.

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