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collectibles

Bakersfield Collector-Con

IN THE August 29 ISSUE

FROM THE 2018 Articles,
andArts & Entertainment,
andSteven Sanchez
SECTIONS

by Steven Sanchez



Ask all the avid comic book readers, film buffs, toy collectors, video game players, and costume-wearing aficionados who love to play dress-up year-round, what’s the most popular gathering for this unique crew of individuals to congregate, only one place comes to mind: San Diego Comic-Con International.

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by Diana Bulls



Salt. It is one thing that all of us have in common ? we need it to survive. In pretty close to every kitchen in America, there is a salt shaker sitting on the table or next to the stove. And, I am willing to bet, that many of those shakers have been filled by a blue box with a little girl carrying an umbrella on the label.

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by Diana Bulls



Halloween is the night before All Hallow’s Day or Hallowmas which occurs on November 1. Today, those of us in the modern church call this All Saints Day. This is a time we remember and celebrate the lives of the faithful men and women who have recently passed away. The feast day was established by Pope Gregory III around the 8th century. Halloween, or to be more correct, Hallowe’en is short for Hallows Eve.

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by Diana Bulls



One of the most curious items to be found on a Victorian lady’s dressing table was a hair receiver. This was a small bowl with a hole in the lid. It was often part of a dressing table set, with a matching powder box. And why you ask, would anyone need a hair receiver? Well, some kind of receptacle was needed to collect and save the hair that accumulated in a lady’s brush or comb after the required daily 100 strokes.

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Vintage Kitchen Gadgets & Gizmos

IN THE January 3 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andDiana Bulls,
andFood Fun,
andHometown History
SECTIONS

by Diana Bulls


Christmas is over. The wrapping paper and ribbons have been cleaned up and the presents have been put into use. Maybe you were the recipient of one of the newest juicers or coffee makers–hopefully not the one that was recalled–or some other kind of clever kitchen device that has been advertised on late night television. My husband, who loves French fries, received a potato cutter from the cats. (Yes, in our family the cats shop for Christmas.)

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by Diana Bulls


Last month, I confessed my obsession with buttons. This month I have to confess that I am equally obsessed with stoneware crockery. It doesn’t matter to me if it is a bottle, jug or jar, I love them for their various shapes, colors and decorations. Before refrigeration, crocks were used in American kitchens to hold foodstuffs such as butter, salted meats and pickled vegetables. They were America’s major house ware from 1780-1890. I use them to hold kitchen utensils, flowers, magazines or kindling. I don’t care if they aren’t in perfect condition.

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by Diana Bulls


Tea time and Mother’s Day seem to go together, so I immediately thought about the simple tea infuser. Once nearly extinct, but now making a comeback, this lowly little item was a necessity for brewing the perfect cup of tea. Infusers were around for a long time before the invention of tea bags. Sometimes called a tea ball or tea egg, by the time of Queen Victoria, no respectable British household would be without one of these, but before we get in to the nitty-gritty of tea infusing, we need a little history lesson on tea itself.

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by Diana Bulls



Most of us pay little or no attention to salt & pepper. They don’t cost much and are easily obtainable at any grocery store. Every household has a container of salt & pepper on the table or in the cupboard, but it wasn’t always this way. At one time, both salt and pepper were literally worth their weight in gold! Modern salt mining techniques and expanded pepper growing regions have made them an everyday item rather than a luxury.

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by Diana Bulls



One of my favorite memories of my grandmother is that of her bottomless cookie jar. Grandma’s cookie jar was always full of snicker doodles, chocolate chip, peanut butter, or my favorite, Oatmeal Crunchies. The old black, crockery jar was shaped like a bean pot and had painted red cherries arching across its front. It sat on the counter just inside the kitchen door, which made it handy for marauding grandchildren. My brother, Bill, was caught red-handed one day and dropped the cookie jar lid on the floor, where it broke in half.

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Fun Collectibles: Vintage Aprons

IN THE May 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2011 Articles,
andDiana Bulls,
andHometown History
SECTIONS

by Diana Bulls



When we think of aprons the image we usually get in our minds is of a mom or grandma wearing one while they cook something up for the family–maybe that’s old fashioned but I think for most of us that’s still the first image that comes to mind. So it seemed appropriate to talk about aprons on Mother’s Day weekend! At the end of this article is a coupon for Valentino’s Italian Restaurant in Reedley-so print it out and take mom for a great Italian meal this week!

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by Diana Bulls



What is the kitchen utensil that does basically one job and does it so well that no one has ever made changes to its basic design? It’s that odd utensil inherited from a grandmother that the unenlightened lets sit in the back of the utensil drawer. I’m talking about the humble potato masher.

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