A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister sites Kings River Lite and KRL News & Reviews for bonus articles.


Animal Rescue Adventures

by Lee Juslin


We all saw the horrifying pictures of pets being abandoned, some tied to trees or poles, while major hurricanes bore down on first Houston, then Florida, and finally on the American territories of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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by Jackie Dale



The Open House is next weekend and the excitement is building. We are, however, a bit short on volunteers for setting up, breaking down, and lots of stuff in between. Please consider donating the gift of time. There are two shifts available to choose from for the 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. event. We all know that many hands makes light work so please shoot Tammy Barker an email right now. In the subject line write “I Want to Volunteer.” Email: tammy@cathouseonthekings[dot]com

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by Stephanie Cameron


Antoine and Bijou are two special boys with a very special role: teaching the next generation how wonderful rats are. Antoine and Bijou are brothers who began life, as do so many of the babies brought to rescues, as part of an “oops” litter. However, they had a lucky start to life–a much different story from what most rescue rats go through. The two beautiful brothers were born into a loving family with children who doted on them every day.

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The Rewards of Adopting a Senior

IN THE October 21 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andAnimal Rescue Adventures,
andLee Juslin
SECTIONS

by Lee Juslin


Many senior dogs come into shelters or rescues because their owners have become ill or have died. Some are simply cruelly discarded from the only home they have ever known because they have committed the sin of getting old, and their families can’t be bothered carrying through on the bargain all dog parents make, or should make, when taking on a canine companion, i.e. to care for them throughout their lives.

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by Lupe Gore


It’s October, and that means Halloween is coming! With Halloween come ghosts, pumpkins, all things creepy and, of course, black cats. Now, there are superstitions about black cats and bad luck—which aren’t true at all. However, those superstitions still keep many people from adopting a black cat. Thankfully, for many black cats who were overlooked at kill shelters and given a death sentence, Feral Paws Rescue stepped in and saved their lives.

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by Joseph Riloquio


Bailey and Bronco are a bonded pair of Bully Breed Mixes. Bailey is a three-year-old female, and Bronco is an almost four-year-old male. Bronco was with us at Valley Animal Center once before when he was just a year old. After only a few short months, Bronco was adopted and found a new home.

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by Wendy Hunter


If you missed the giant Reptile/Pet Show at the Fresno Fairgrounds a few weeks ago, you didn’t miss one little thing. What you did miss was one BIG selection of brightly colored creatures, inching through glass display cases, and scavenging for tasty treats. And I’m not just talking about the crowd. I’m talking about the creepy, crawly, scary, slimy, bearded, bug-eyed critters that kids and adults alike just couldn’t get enough of.

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by Jackie Dale



So, I have returned from my two month summer hiatus. I generally only take the one month, with Harvie graciously filling in for me. However, this year brought many circumstances that were unyielding and very demanding. Well, of course, the onslaught of kittens was non-stop. Then in mid-July, I blew out my knee while simultaneously pulling the hamstring in my other leg. I suffered a torn ACL, a torn meniscus, and a fractured knee cap. Understandably, I was in a lot of pain and not too mobile. Fortunately my daughter was able to step in and help out with the kittens.

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by Alyssa Nader


I became a rat mom last year when I adopted my first two rats, Bitey and Pablo. I remember bringing them home from Vacaville, stopping at a BBQ place on the way and feeding them little bites of everything through the holes in their tiny carrier. When we got home I made them a little house out of an Amazon box inside their cage.

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Fresno Bully Rescue: Queen Irene

IN THE September 23 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andAnimal Rescue Adventures
SECTIONS

by Terese Shaw


A couple of months ago Fresno Bully Rescue took a chance on a senior female Pit Bull named Irene. She was picked up by animal control at a local shelter with a long list on medical problems. She had been attacked and brought in with open wounds on her body. In addition to the recent attack, Irene had obviously long suffered from neglect and over breeding.

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Valley Animal Center: Bear

IN THE September 16 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andAnimal Rescue Adventures
SECTIONS

by Joseph Riloquio


Bear is a 10-year-old male German Shepherd who was recently brought back to Valley Animal Centre after spending four years with his previous adopters. He was originally rescued from a local animal control agency and brought to VAC five years ago where he quickly became a staff and volunteer favorite. His huge personality combined with his size and fluffy fur coat earned him the name Bear.

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by Lee Juslin


Picked up as a stray by a shelter, it was thought the little white dog was part Cairn, so the shelter people called Col. Potter Cairn Terrier Rescue.
The Col. Potter volunteers had their doubts about the background of the little dog they named Carousel, so they had her DNA tested. It turns out that little Carousel is fifty percent Chinese Crested and equal parts Chihuahua and Shih Tzu.

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by Wendy Hunter


Some people collect snow globes and shot glasses, while others collect animals. They rescue the dozens of undernourished and unwanted dogs and cats roaming their neighborhood. The Hoarding Animals Research Consortium defines animal hoarding as: “having more than the typical number of companion animals; an inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and vet care.

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by Lupe Gore


When Milo the kitty showed up one day at a feral feeding station in a dark, trash-strewn alley in South Los Angeles, he was just one of the hundreds of thousands of cats and kittens in this huge city who might have once had a home, but were then dumped on the street: their owners die, move away, or simply don’t want a cat around any more, and they are left to fend for themselves.

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