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Mental Health

by Christine Anderson


Jessie Close is an internationally recognized speaker, author, poet, and advocate for mental health reform. She lives with bipolar disorder in the foothills of the Tobacco Root Mountains outside Bozeman, Montana with her service dog, Snitz, and three other dogs. She is the author of The Warping of Al (Harper & Row, 1990), and she writes a regular blog for Bring Change 2 Mind, an anti-stigma organization that her sister, Glenn, created at Jessie’s request.

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Why a World Bipolar Day?

IN THE March 28 ISSUE

FROM THE 2015 Articles,
andMental Health,
andMuffy Walker
SECTIONS

by Muffy Walker




World Diabetes Day, World Cancer Day, and even World Egg Day. And now, drum roll please, World Bipolar Day (WBD). WBD is a day to bring about awareness of bipolar disorder. It is the brainchild of Dr. Pichet Udomratn, a member of the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder (ANBD), who collaborated with International Bipolar Foundation (IBPF) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) to bring his idea to fruition. Now each year, WBD will be celebrated on March 30, the birthday of Vincent Van Gogh, who was posthumously diagnosed as probably having bipolar disorder.

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by Christine Anderson


Fox’s new drama, Empire, tells the rags-to-riches story of the Lyon family, whose patriarch, Lucious, played by Terrance Howard, rises to fame as a hip-hop artist, and starts a record label called Empire with drug money his ex-wife, Cookie (Taraji P. Henson), earned by dealing, for which she spent 17 years in prison. She left behind three children.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham



Forever Different is the true story of Christine Anderson’s struggle with bipolar disorder. Even without mental health issues, Christine’s life has never been easy, but this story shows her struggles and her triumphs with brutal honesty.

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by Roberta Tovey



Millions of people suffer from depression and bipolar disorder, but the treatments we have today, though helpful for some, do not work for everyone. Some treatments can work for a while, but become less effective over time. Others come with problematic side effects. Alternative therapies, like exercise and meditation, are often overlooked.

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by Carmel Christine



A turn of events can catapult your life as you know it into a sphere so foreign, so cold, dark, distant and frightening that you barely recognize it. My teen son was diagnosed with Bipolar several years ago. This disorder didn’t arrive subtly so we could slowly get our bearings and adjust to it. But, of course that likely wouldn’t have made a difference.

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by Muffy Walker



Last week I received a call from a colleague inquiring whether I had heard about the recent homicide that occurred not too far from where I live. I had not, but quickly researched the incident.

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by Christine Anderson


I was diagnosed Bipolar I in 1987 and I spent 23 years in denial, became medication compliant in 2008, and finally accepted my disease in 2010. I have been in recovery since 2011.
I have experienced all three stages of my topic and I would like to discuss with you and tell you from first-hand experience what each one of them feels and looks like.

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by Muffy Walker




At a recent summer BBQ, I sat quietly at a picnic table while the other mothers bragged about their children. “Tommy scored the winning goal in the lacrosse playoffs,” beamed Sally. “Jessica was accepted to all five of her top college choices, and is going to Stanford,” boasted Lucinda. “Greg won the debate contest, Carla got perfect SAT’s, Matthew landed a job at Deloitte”…the list of accomplishments was endless.

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by Muffy Walker




Bipolar disorder affects 5.7million American adults. For each person with this disorder, or any other malady for that matter, there are millions more who are their caregivers.

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How to Promote Recovery from Mental Illness

IN THE July 12 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andMental Health
SECTIONS

by Rev. Mary Alice Do



Often people are unaware that friends, acquaintances and co-workers are struggling with a mental illness. This makes it seem like mental illness is not a serious problem, but it is. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one in four people will have a mental illness in any given year; one in 17 has a serious mental illness. Add to this loved ones and you have a great many people affected.

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by Muffy Walker



Did you know most people spend one third of their lives sleeping? Healthy sleep patterns are an important part of our life, especially for those who have bipolar disorder or other mood disorder. According to the American Psychiatric Association, sleep disturbance is a core symptom of bipolar disorder. The diagnostic criteria indicate that during manic episodes there may be a reduced need for sleep and during episodes of depression, insomnia or hypersomnia can be experienced nearly every day. Therefore, good sleep hygiene, a pillar of the treatment plan, is very important.

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by Kay Saterlee



I am what the rescue community calls a networker. All day long, I post and re-post photos of animals in need. These include animals who are at risk of being euthanized at high kill shelters and animals thrown away like day-old garbage. I see hundreds of dogs and cats every week. I have become painfully aware that I am unable to save all of them. Eventually, there came a point where I became apathetic to the suffering. It was something I swore would never happen, but seeing so much suffering every day will cause even the most sensitive to become numb.

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Alicia’s Bipolar Story

IN THE May 17 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andMental Health
SECTIONS

by Alicia Smith



For 34 years I was self-employed; working for a lunatic. I worked long, hard and successfully but used work as a way to “escape” my mental illness. Many years later I realized that work was my coping mechanism. Many people engage in drugs, sex, gambling, alcohol, cigarettes and other vices; my escape was work and sugar, my “drugs” of choice.

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by Tom Sims


It just so happens that healthy food not only makes healthy bodies, but making healthy food can keep minds healthy as well.
Among the community gardens in Fresno are some special gardens tended by elders who find peace, serenity, and purpose in the process of growing vegetables. In that same process, they produce food for themselves, their families, and their neighbors.

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The Black Box: TV Review

IN THE May 10 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andChris Lovato,
andMental Health,
andTV
SECTIONS

by Chris Lovato



Humans have explored the depths of the oceans and the vast reaches of outer space, but one of the toughest puzzles we’ve been faced for centuries is one very close to home: the human brain and mind. Although neuroscience and psychology have come a long way in the last century, doctors still deal with stymieing neural cases every day and sometimes, even have to deal with it themselves. ABC gives us a peek into the world of one such doctor in its midseason venture, Black Box.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham



May is Mental Health Month so KRL will be posting a few mental health related articles this month. We are starting with an interview with the current board president of the Fresno affiliate of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illiness), Mary Lou Brauti-Minkler.

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by Muffy Walker




Summer vacation will soon arrive. Parents and children alike often see this as a time to relax. Household rules may become more lax, bedtimes later, chores not upheld, play dates increase and thoughtful meal planning takes a back seat. For most children, this lack of structure, although initially welcomed, becomes a burden to all concerned. For those with bipolar disorder (and other behavioral and emotional issues), the lack of structure only complicates the course of the illness, often times upsetting the stability that was present during the school year.

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