A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and new articles throughout the week, including — movie reviews each Monday at 7pm and live events Wednesdays at 7pm. If you love mysteries — explore Mysteryrat’s Maze — there's something for everyone… and check out our sister site on Blogger for bonus articles.


Hometown History shares stories of the rich and interesting history of California towns, along with other interesting history tidbits.Click on article titles to see full articles.

Reedley History: The Granger Twins

IN THE July 12 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andHometown History,
andJim Bulls
SECTIONS

by Jim Bulls


Before the year 1892, Reedley awakened to activity on G Street where today we enjoy Pioneer Park. Chinese laborers were building brick kilns for the Craycroft Brick Company. These kilns would fire bricks that would be used to build two warehouses commissioned by the Granger’s Bank of California, located in San Francisco.

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by Diana Bulls



“Summer’s here and the livin’ is easy. Fish are jumpin’ and the cotton is high.” Well, actually it’s not cotton, but fruits and vegetables. That’s right, summer’s bounty can be found at our local farmer’s market on Wednesday night, at fruit stands and in our own backyards. The variety of fruits and vegetables we have available is one of the best things about summer in the San Joaquin Valley.

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by Jim Bulls


It was a cold and windy, West Texas thunderstorm that was pounding Amherst’s brand-new South Plains Farmer’s Co-Op Hospital when Howard Bulls joined the ranks of fatherhood. He was well aware that this honor could be short-lived: my mother had been hospitalized since the first day of March, battling toxemia. I arrived at two pounds, and with no incubator available, Dr. McDonald gave me a life expectancy of three days. Using the technology of a chicken brooder, the janitor rigged up a tent and a heat lamp over my crib.

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Going To Pot: Collecting Stoneware

IN THE June 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andDiana Bulls,
andFood,
andHometown History
SECTIONS

by Diana Bulls


Last month, I confessed my obsession with buttons. This month I have to confess that I am equally obsessed with stoneware crockery. It doesn’t matter to me if it is a bottle, jug or jar, I love them for their various shapes, colors and decorations. Before refrigeration, crocks were used in American kitchens to hold foodstuffs such as butter, salted meats and pickled vegetables. They were America’s major house ware from 1780-1890. I use them to hold kitchen utensils, flowers, magazines or kindling. I don’t care if they aren’t in perfect condition.

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by Maria Ruiz



I was a young wife whose husband had recently graduated from the University. His first job in a coastal city of California meant we had to move. My husband, Bob, our five year old son, Barry, our dog Fuzzy and I moved into a typical middle class neighborhood. What had seemed like a fortune for college students, Bob’s salary at the new job, turned out to be just a bit short of meeting our bills.

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by Jim Bulls


Last time I left you, we were cruizin’ Reedley and eating cheeseburgers in 1960, as well as checking out the gas stations and bulk plants. But, you might ask, how did kids afford cars way back then, not to mention gas, insurance and cheeseburgers? We’ll get to that, after a little history.

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byTrish Johnson



Here it is 2014 and after 100 years of existence, both the City of Orange Cove and the Orange Cove Women’s Club will be celebrating its centennial. Three service organizations met collectively to plan a special event entitled “BACK IN TIME: A 100 YEARS OF MEMORIES,” which will take place on May 31. The Orange Cove Women’s Club, the Orange Cove Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Orange Cove American Legion have been working diligently to plan a celebration for the people of Orange Cove. With the help of several local packing houses acting as sponsors, these three entities were able to plan this back in time event.

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by Diana Bulls


Ever since Eve ate the apple in the Garden of Eden, humans have been trying to fashion coverings for their bodies. Fig leaves progressed to animal skins (much softer and less itchy), and eventually to woven cloth. And along the way, a plethora of sewing accessories have come into being, opening another opportunity for collectors: the fascinating history of fashion and the evolution of how garments were created.

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by Diana Bulls



Here we are, Easter almost upon us, with spring just around the corner–well whatever we call spring in central California. When I think of spring and Easter (the secular holiday, not the real one), it’s not long before I am thinking about eggs, specifically deviled eggs. Honestly, can you have an Easter picnic or get together and not have deviled eggs? Not in my family. In fact, Thanksgiving is the only time the family gets together when deviled eggs aren’t there too.

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by Jim Bulls


The last time we slid back in time it was to 1950 and I was pedaling around town on my J.C. Higgins ‘Hiawatha’ bike, checking out the auto dealerships around Reedley. Today we are going to slide back to 1958, while “cruizin” in my 1940 Ford Coupe.

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by Diana Bulls


Reamers–a useful little kitchen gadget–have been around for a long time, but their heyday only lasted through the 1930s and into World War II.

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Rideabout Reedley: Then & Now

IN THE February 22 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andHometown History,
andJim Bulls
SECTIONS

by Jim Bulls


Flipping back to 1949–I just got a butch haircut at Vic’s Barbershop and as a budding “gear head” I hopped on my bike to check out the car dealers. I was hoping that they had done a sloppy job of covering the showroom windows with butcher paper, because I wanted to get a peek at the new cars for 1950.

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by Diana Bulls


Today there are not many Americans who think about how to store food. Nearly every household has a refrigerator, a freezer and a variety of plastic or metal storage canisters. Food comes from the grocery store in cans, bottles, boxes or bags–ready to just put away in the frig or pantry–with little concern about hungry critters

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Christmas at Kearney

IN THE December 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andArts & Entertainment,
andHometown History,
andTess Mize
SECTIONS

by Tess Mize



The holiday season is a time for nostalgia. It’s the time of the year when people wax poetic about their childhood traditions, family gatherings and days gone by. A particularly popular source of nostalgia for this time of year is the Victorian Era, perhaps because our Victorian forebears are the ones who started many of the now traditional celebrations associated with Christmas.

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