A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and other special articles throughout the week — there's something for everyone. Check out our sister site KRL News & Reviews for even more articles every week.


Hometown History

by Diana Bulls



The Hotel Burgess, a 100-year-old Reedley landmark located on the corner of 11th and G streets, reopened its doors last July. The Hotel Burgess has been operating for nearly all of those 100 years—closed only for about three years before being purchased by Jose and Wendy Rivera.

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by Diana Bulls


Anyone who lives in Central California knows that to get from north to south, you take State Route 99 (SR99), or as most of us call it, Highway 99. If you are heading north to Sacramento or south to Bakersfield, or any of the cities in between, you are going to get there via SR99.

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by Evelyne Vivies


Whether you’re a history buff or you just enjoy exploring pieces of our past, visiting a local museum is an educational and interesting experience. One such museum, the Tulare Historical Museum, is the perfect place to learn more about Tulare, a small town located in the heart of the Central Valley, which holds a special place in our valley’s history.

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by Jim Bulls


It was the summer of 1964. My family was on our annual pilgrimage back to Texas and Oklahoma. This year, though, instead of heading to Texas first, we stopped in Tulsa to give Grandma’s yard a major trim and clean-up, and get the house ready for the coming winter.

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by Lorie Lewis Ham



This week we are interviewing Valley historian and author Stephen H. Provost. Last year he released his book Highway 99. The book is filled with historic photographs and forgotten tales. Highway 99 is a nostalgia-fueled road trip into California motoring culture. Details at the end of this post on how to enter to win a copy of Highway 99, and a link to purchase it from Amazon.

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by Diana Bulls



Decorating the Christmas tree is a walk down memory lane for me. Each ornament that is unwrapped has a special story. Included in this collected are “ornaments” that have been made with bits and pieces of Christmas. It was looking at these that started me thinking about popcorn.

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Reedley History: Autorama

IN THE November 18 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andHometown History,
andJim Bulls
SECTIONS

by Jim Bulls


Since I was born just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, my first exposure to “gear-head-itis” was to the cars of the 1930s. At that time, all the car makers were vying for what few dollars there were available for new cars. During the Great Depression, many of America’s finest auto makers would perish from bankruptcy.

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by Jim Bulls


This is the season when our patriotic blood seems to flow the strongest and we seem to pay more attention to memorials dedicated to fallen patriots. Since we celebrate the birth of our Nation in July, we often reminisce about wars and conflicts, how and where those patriots served. I’ve been thinking about ships.

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Reedley: Ripe for Retirement

IN THE June 24 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andHometown History,
andJim Bulls
SECTIONS

by Jim Bulls


There was once a time, that small family farms surrounded the Reedley city limits. Does anyone remember where the Sellers, Fast or Nickel farms were? The home Johnny Rios lives in, in the triangle of North, D and 10th streets, was once a family farmhouse. Does anyone remember horses and cattle grazing in the pasture west of the Lincoln School playground next to Frankwood Avenue? Or the Harry Shuklian farm east of Lincoln School?

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Reedley History: The Shine Man

IN THE May 13 ISSUE

FROM THE 2017 Articles,
andHometown History,
andJim Bulls
SECTIONS

by Jim Bulls


Shoe shiners have been around for quite a while. Ever king or noble required his expensive, handmade shoes or boots to have the perfect shine. Throughout the 19th century, shoeshine boys could be seen on most city streets. However with the industrial revolution, shoes were being turned out by the hundreds. Shoe polish was invented by the 1900s and shoe shining became a brand new trade.

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