A California Magazine with Local Focus and Global Appeal:
Community - Entertainment - Human Interest


Weekly issues every Saturday morning and new articles throughout the week, including — movie reviews each Monday at 7pm and live events Wednesdays at 7pm. If you love mysteries — explore Mysteryrat’s Maze — there's something for everyone… and check out our sister site on Blogger for bonus articles.


Hometown History shares stories of the rich and interesting history of California towns, along with other interesting history tidbits.Click on article titles to see full articles.

by Diana Bulls



Here we are, Easter almost upon us, with spring just around the corner–well whatever we call spring in central California. When I think of spring and Easter (the secular holiday, not the real one), it’s not long before I am thinking about eggs, specifically deviled eggs. Honestly, can you have an Easter picnic or get together and not have deviled eggs? Not in my family. In fact, Thanksgiving is the only time the family gets together when deviled eggs aren’t there too.

{ 1 comment }

by Jim Bulls


The last time we slid back in time it was to 1950 and I was pedaling around town on my J.C. Higgins ‘Hiawatha’ bike, checking out the auto dealerships around Reedley. Today we are going to slide back to 1958, while “cruizin” in my 1940 Ford Coupe.

{ 0 comments }

by Diana Bulls


Reamers–a useful little kitchen gadget–have been around for a long time, but their heyday only lasted through the 1930s and into World War II.

{ 1 comment }

Rideabout Reedley: Then & Now

IN THE February 22 ISSUE

FROM THE 2014 Articles,
andHometown History,
andJim Bulls
SECTIONS

by Jim Bulls


Flipping back to 1949–I just got a butch haircut at Vic’s Barbershop and as a budding “gear head” I hopped on my bike to check out the car dealers. I was hoping that they had done a sloppy job of covering the showroom windows with butcher paper, because I wanted to get a peek at the new cars for 1950.

{ 0 comments }

by Diana Bulls


Today there are not many Americans who think about how to store food. Nearly every household has a refrigerator, a freezer and a variety of plastic or metal storage canisters. Food comes from the grocery store in cans, bottles, boxes or bags–ready to just put away in the frig or pantry–with little concern about hungry critters

{ 0 comments }

Christmas at Kearney

IN THE December 7 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andArts & Entertainment,
andHometown History,
andTess Mize
SECTIONS

by Tess Mize



The holiday season is a time for nostalgia. It’s the time of the year when people wax poetic about their childhood traditions, family gatherings and days gone by. A particularly popular source of nostalgia for this time of year is the Victorian Era, perhaps because our Victorian forebears are the ones who started many of the now traditional celebrations associated with Christmas.

{ 0 comments }

by Maria Ruiz




Ernesto kicked the wet sand. A cold breeze ruffled his collar and fog collected on his hair and eyebrows. He looked out toward the dark, cold and uninviting Pacific Ocean as it lapped along the beach on a cold June morning in Santa Barbara. Why would a big American company want this lonely, cold beach?

{ 5 comments }

by Diana Bulls


Those who know Jim and I well, know that we love history and all things historical which includes our family genealogy. Jim’s mother, Minnie Bulls, could almost be a professional genealogy researcher and, fortunately, my relatives were really good record keepers.

{ 4 comments }

by Georgia Lincshied



Lincoln School celebrates its Centennial year for Reedley. In 1912, it was decided the town needed a school on the East side of Reedley so children did not have to cross the R.R. tracks to get to and from the only school, which is now Washington. In 1913, Eastside School opened. It was a two-story brick building which was torn down in the 1960s, when many buildings were considered unsafe during earthquakes. The schools were then renamed.

{ 2 comments }

by Jim Bulls



The start of the 1920s finds Drake Manufacturing moving to their new location at East and South Avenues (now Dinuba Ave.). Having perfected the Jadson Motor Valve, Drake closed the garage and Buick agency to devote all their efforts toward the valve business. The Drake Family still finds time for racing and a new hobby: barnstorming. In fact, on the roof of the new building “Jadson Motor Valve Company” is painted for anyone passing or flying by to see. 1920 was bittersweet for the Drake Family however, as family patriarch John Alexander passes away.

{ 2 comments }

by Diana Bulls


Tea time and Mother’s Day seem to go together, so I immediately thought about the simple tea infuser. Once nearly extinct, but now making a comeback, this lowly little item was a necessity for brewing the perfect cup of tea. Infusers were around for a long time before the invention of tea bags. Sometimes called a tea ball or tea egg, by the time of Queen Victoria, no respectable British household would be without one of these, but before we get in to the nitty-gritty of tea infusing, we need a little history lesson on tea itself.

{ 0 comments }

by Jim Bulls



America may have been a late comer to the industrial revolution, but the country had the advantage of possessing the raw materials needed to excel in manufacturing. The only thing imported was cheap labor. The industrialization of transportation began with the “horseless carriage.” These vehicles were propelled by three types power.

{ 3 comments }

by Jim Bulls



It’s a challenge not to be repetitious while writing for Kings River Life–in many of the stories I have written before, it is inevitable that Reedley’s history will come up. It is also astonishing to realize that the lifetime I have spent in Reedley spans over half of the City’s existence! That’s right, not just the centennial, not even the incorporation, but since the very inception of a town named Reedley (by one year) in 1888.

{ 0 comments }

by Jim Bulls



In the early 1900s, a great Pentecostal movement started in the Azuza Street Church in Los Angeles, and those called to God set forth on a mission of revivals throughout the United States.

{ 0 comments }

by Diana Bulls



Most of us pay little or no attention to salt & pepper. They don’t cost much and are easily obtainable at any grocery store. Every household has a container of salt & pepper on the table or in the cupboard, but it wasn’t always this way. At one time, both salt and pepper were literally worth their weight in gold! Modern salt mining techniques and expanded pepper growing regions have made them an everyday item rather than a luxury.

{ 0 comments }

Typewriters

IN THE March 2 ISSUE

FROM THE 2013 Articles,
andHometown History
SECTIONS

by Kristalyn Patzkowski




According to the Oxford Dictionary, technology is “the application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, especially in industry.” In the modern world, the word “industry” is so closely linked to computers that we assume that technology is limited to computers as well. However, the oxford dictionary expands the definition so nearly every invention in history can be considered a technology. Such an invention would be the typewriter, which has been surpassed by the computer industry, but it has managed to create a legacy of its own.

{ 3 comments }

  • Arts & Entertainment

  • Books & Tales

  • Community

  • Education

  • Food

  • Helping Hands

  • Hometown History

  • Pets

  • Teens

  • Terrific Tales